Malta holidays

Experience Malta

Best Places to Visit

The first stop for most tourists is the capital city, Valletta. Valletta is steeped in history; after the Knights of St John were forced to leave Jerusalem they eventually settled in Malta. As a result, the city has a veritable collection of stunning architecture, in fact, it is often said that Valletta is one of the most concentrated historic areas in the world.

Sliema and St Julian's are often the next stop for tourists. Both of these coastal towns have plenty of nightlife and restaurants. However, the previously quiet fishing village of St Julian's is considered more scenic. It's also right next door to Paceville, a town renowned for its numerous night clubs, bars and restaurants.

Valletta hasn't always been the capital of Malta; Mdina once claimed the title. A very small, scenic city, it is rumoured to have been built nearly four thousand years ago. Many of the buildings were ruined in a devastating earthquake in the 17th century; however, the walls of the city and many historic buildings still stand. Mdina is incredibly peaceful, helped in a big way by the fact that vehicles are prohibited here. Thanks to this it has earned the nickname 'the quiet city'.

Rabat, not far from Mdina is a small town with plenty of charm. Here visitors can see the Cathedral of St. Paul, highlighting the Maltese devotion to the saints. There are many churches and cathedrals across the main island, especially in Valletta and Victoria.

For history boffins, the Lascaris War Rooms in Valletta are a little harder to find, but are a great place to visit. Carved out of solid rock, these caves used to house the Allied Air and Naval Forces headquarters during WWII. Inside, visitors can take an audio, self-guided tour through all the different operations rooms.

For those who'd like to escape from the hustle and bustle, a trip to Mdina is in order. Known as 'the silent city', Mdina forbids any traffic from entering its walls, save those vehicles belonging to a limited number of residents. Boasting a fascinating fusion of Baroque and Norman architecture, the city centre is marked by the imposing and dramatic Metropolitan Cathedral of Saint Paul. An ancient, fortified city, it also acts as home to some sites of historical interest, including the medieval Palazzo Falson and the mysterious Mdina Dungeons.

Top Landmarks

Malta is bursting with historic artefacts and ruins. The Hagar Qim Temple is over five thousand years old and is a UNESCO World Heritage site. All of the artefacts originally found here are now on display in the National Museum of Archeology in Valletta, a stunning building with many other displays and exhibitions and definitely worth a peek.

Also not far from here is the Hal Saflieni Hypogeum, yet another World Heritage site. This underground structure sometimes referred to as The Labyrinth, is believed to date back to 2500BC, making it one of the oldest structures in the world. Tours are available on both sites although it is not recommended to take children under the age of six.

Just between Lija and Attard is the San Anton Palace. Built as a country retreat for Antoine de Paule in the 17th century, it has changed hands many times but is now the official residence of the Maltese president. What really sells the palace as an attraction though is the walled gardens surrounding it. Visitors can stroll through citrus and avocado groves, through the bird aviary and past some fountains right up to the front of the palace.

Another great place to visit is the Blue Grotto. These seven caves in the south of the island are the perfect backdrop to the famous clear blue waters. It is reasonably easy to access the cave system by renting small boats found in the small pier on the mainland.

Entertainment

Malta is a very relaxed, quiet place, so finding nightlife can be difficult. The undisputed number one for bars and clubs is Paceville, a town right next door to St Julian's. The bars and clubs all boast free entry and play primarily western music, so party goers can move from club to club until they find the best place to dance the night away. There's a bustling atmosphere in Paceville every night of the week; the drinks are cheap and the nightlife goes on right through till morning.

For those visitors who want to get serious about their clubbing experience there is Gianpula. There are music festivals and one-off events, but Gianpula is also open every Friday and Saturday night. With a swimming pool and seven bars, it is quite the experience.

For those tourists seeking a more traditional musical experience, many bars in the less touristy towns have impromptu live music. Traditional Maltese music tends to be folk guitar based, while men usually argue in musical tones over the top of it. Seeing a musical debate might sound like an odd way to spend an evening, but it's an excellent way to experience the traditional Maltese nightlife.

For those tourists wanting to take a risk and try to make their million, the Dragonara Casino in St Julian's is one of the most renowned on the island. As well as gambling, visitors can enjoy performances and shows that are held at the casnio regularly.

Dining Out

One important aspect of Maltese cuisine is rabbit, and this an integral ingredient of the island's traditional mainstay, rekaata. Mostly eaten at celebrations, it consists of a first course of spaghetti in rabbit sauce; this is followed up by fried rabbit meat, usually with gravy. There are restaurants across the island that specialise in this dish, so it's not hard to find for those tourists wanting a real taste of Malta. The traditional pastizzi, a small savoury pastry parcel, can also be found in this style of restaurant.

On the whole, Maltese cuisine is heavily influenced by Italy. Although there are restaurants in the more touristy areas that offer traditional British food, there are also many places offering Italian food such as pizza and pasta.

Since Malta is an island, delicious, fresh fish can be found in many restaurants across the country. Lampuki fish, sometimes called dolphin fish, is a speciality, and is often fried and served in a spicy tomato based sauce.

Maltese sausage is served in a variety of ways; the salted pork can be eaten raw or can be roasted.

Kinnie is a Maltese, fizzy, non-alcoholic drink that tastes a little like a martini and is made from very bitter oranges.

Beach

For the beach loving tourists there is the Golden Bay, a beautiful sandy beach on the northwest of the island. Here visitors can indulge in water sports, have a dip in the crystal clear waters or just chill out on the white sands.

Romance

A great place to escape for romance, thanks to the beautiful beaches and stunning architecture, is St Julian's. This town in the northeast has many high-end resorts that cater for visitors after that little something special. Many of the resorts here are set slightly back from the main part of town, so although they are within walking distance of the action, there's definitely a sense of seclusion. There are also a lot of spas that offer couples massage services to make the perfect trip even more relaxing.

Family

Almost all of the resorts on the beaches offer snorkelling and other, child-friendly, activities that are great for families (with the exception of Paceville). However, for those wanting to do something slightly more adventurous there are a number of boat and catamaran operators across the island, and a day trip often includes a buffet along with some sensational sights. Travellers also enjoy taking a dip in the azures seas that cradle the island.

Adventure

While thrill-seeking activities such as rock climbing and kayaking (there are tour operators across the island that offer equipment and tours) are available, Malta's premier pastime is scuba diving. With warm temperatures and good visibility, it is possible to dive all year round. A lot of the dives also start closer to the shore, making it considerably cheaper and ideal for beginners. The Inland Sea in Gozo is an amazing dive; playing home to shipwreck sites, octopi and moray eels.

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Need to know

Language

The national language of Malta is Maltese. Descending from Arabic, over the years it has come to resemble Italian and Sicilian. In 1964, Malta gained independence from British rule, and as a result, English is an official language, with the government working in a mix of English and Maltese. This also means that around 90 per cent of the population can speak English. However, it is worthwhile investing in a Maltese phrasebook or language guide, as the Maltese tend to look favourably on those who make even the most basic of attempts at greetings and courtesies. /p>

Currency

The Maltese lira was replaced by the euro in 2008, and this is the only legal tender accepted on the island. There are one or two foreign banks on the island (such as HSBC), but visitors can also use foreign credit and debit cards at any of the local banks. However, a word of caution, some of these don't accept American Express cards. Money can also be withdrawn at tourist offices and some hotels. Changing currency into euros can be done at either the bank or at the currency converter machines that are found at all the major tourist areas. There is a charge for this service though, and the exchange rate is often more favourable at the banks. Travellers' cheques are very welcome, especially at hotels as most make a profit on transactions.

Visas

Visiting Malta is extremely easy where visas are concerned as it is not necessary to obtain one. Malta is a signatory to the Schengen Agreement, in which 26 separate European Nations agreed to open their border to other member nations. As a result, Malta is open to citizens of all Schengen states. Citizens of EU countries which have not signed the agreement, including the UK, are also granted access to the country without a visa and for an unlimited period of time. However, it can still be worth carrying a passport, credit card and driving license in the event of needing to hire certain things, such as car-hire. Non-EU citizens generally need a visa in order to enter as a tourist for up to 90 days.

Climate

Malta has a Mediterranean climate characterised by warm summers and mild winters, and while rain may occasionally occur during winter, summers are predominately dry. The average yearly temperature here comes in at around 23°C, with yearly highs hitting 27°C during August.

Malta also experiences one of the most optimal arrangements of daylight hours in Europe. Winter days aren’t as short as in the northern part of the continent, with daylight hours during the months of December, January and February averaging 10.3.

Main Airports

Malta only has one airport on the island, Malta International Airport, situated between Luqa and Gudja. Sometimes referred to as Luqa Airport, it's a few miles south-west of the capital, Valletta. Tourists can fly to Malta from most European airports and can enjoy duty-free shopping and restaurants available at Malta International Airport.

Flight Options

Malta International Airport is the main travel hub, receiving flights from numerous European destinations throughout the week. Many airlines fly direct from London, Manchester and Newcastle. To fly from London to Malta non-stop takes around 3 hours.

Travel Advice

The peak travel season in Malta is between July and August, so booking outside of this time could guarantee a cheaper flight. Travelling away from the airport is relatively easy. It's perhaps easiest to take a taxi three short miles into the capital of Valletta (there are many available, although they can be a little pricey).

Other Transport Options

It is possible to get to Malta via boat. There are ferry services from Catania, Sicily, which run eight times a week and all year round, taking around 4 hours 15 minutes. For those who don't mind travelling, this is a relaxing way to soak up some Mediterranean sun.

Getting Around

As there is only the one airport, flying around Malta isn't an option. Thankfully, the island is quite small, and there are a number of reliable bus companies that can be utilised. While the roads are not perfect, they are in reasonably good shape. There is also the option of travelling by sea, which is a great way to see the island in all its glory.

Bus

The Malta bus network is a structure of sleek, air-conditioned vehicles run by the private company Arriva. All tickets can be purchased at major bus stops or at a number of shops across the island.

Car

Driving in Malta isn't the easiest of experiences as roads are not clearly signposted, but it is cheap and offers plenty of freedom. Car rental is extremely cheap and shops can be found at the airport, although local agencies are also situated in the towns and at beach resorts.

Ferry

Malta is made up of two main islands, so if visitors are wishing to explore the whole of Malta, going by boat is the only option. The Gozo Channel Company runs a service from Cirkewwa, on the main island, up to Gozo, on the smaller northern island. Crossings run as late as 22:00pm; however, during the winter months schedules can change. There are buses running all day from the capital Valletta up to the ferry terminal. The ferry is relatively cheap, and takes around half an hour.

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MALTA`S WEATHER TODAY

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AVERAGE RAINFALL (mm)

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FACTS

  1. Malta is a popular backdrop for blockbuster movies, which include Gladiator, World War Z and Captain Philips.
  2. In spite of its small size, Malta is home to no less than 10 UNESCO World Heritage Sites.
  3. Between the months of June and September, Malta hosts around 75 village feasts, each in honour of the village's particular patron saint.
  4. Malta's megalithic temples are thought to be older than both Stonehenge and the pyramids of Ancient Egypt.
  5. During the Great Siege of 1565, Malta was defended from the Ottomans by the Knights of St John of Jerusalem.
  6. The Maltese drive on the left.

FACTS

  1. Malta is a popular backdrop for blockbuster movies, which include Gladiator, World War Z and Captain Philips.
  2. In spite of its small size, Malta is home to no less than 10 UNESCO World Heritage Sites.
  3. Between the months of June and September, Malta hosts around 75 village feasts, each in honour of the village's particular patron saint.
  4. Malta's megalithic temples are thought to be older than both Stonehenge and the pyramids of Ancient Egypt.
  5. During the Great Siege of 1565, Malta was defended from the Ottomans by the Knights of St John of Jerusalem.
  6. The Maltese drive on the left.

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