Kavos holidays

Experience Kavos

Experience [destination]

Best Places to Visit

When holidaymakers arrive in Kavos, holidays become mostly about white sand beaches and the clear waters of Kavos Beach. However, there are several other places dotted around the island of Corfu which make for appealing sightseeing.

A short drive from the non-stop partying in Kavos takes you to the peace and quiet of the Lefkimmis salt flats. Now a nature reserve, the area offers many quiet beaches and traditional villages.

Further afield, the most charming town on the entire island of Corfu, Corfu Town, has struck just the right balance between elegance and romance. The town is home to several historical Greek sites, including two WWII forts. The architecture in Corfu Town is something to behold. Boasting examples of French, Venetian and British design, Corfu Town offers some must-see buildings.

Travellers looking for something a bit different from the party atmosphere in Kavos will be delighted with the slow pace of life in Kynopiastes. Located just 10kms from Corfu Town, this quaint village is the perfect place to experience a quintessentially Greek package holiday. Walk through the narrow cobbled streets of the central town square and admire the 17th century architecture of marble churches and ancient mansions which call this lovely little place home.

Nymphes is probably the most mystical of all the villages but also the greenest and most naturally beautiful. Legend has it that nymphs would take their baths in the waterfalls of the village. Visitors to the waterfalls today may even come across a few nymphs themselves. Legend aside, the waterfalls are well worth a visit.

Undoubtedly the best museum in the region, Corfu Town's Archaeological Museum should not be missed. Located towards the south of the coast, the museum is just a short way from the town itself. Boasting many exhibits, the museum does a stellar job of chronicling the island's history. From Neolithic weapons to ancient coins, the museum is comprehensive. One of the most famous exhibits is a large Gorgon pediment found in the Paleopolis' Doric Temple.

If it is peace and quiet tourists are after, they should make their way to Lakones, a traditional village located on the slope of a hill overlooking the Bay of Paleokastritsa. Lakones is filled with quaint little coffee shops which are perfect for spending hours reading in and Byzantine-era cathedrals simply begging to be explored.

Visitors are not restricted to just exploring on land. Take a boat trip out into the glorious blue Ionian Sea and discover hidden coves for quiet picnics. The unspoilt island of Paxos lies to the south of Kavos or you could even take a day-trip to Albania.

Top Landmarks

The most popular attractions in Corfu Town are the two forts of Pale— Froœrio and Neo Froœrio. Worked on by various rulers including the Byzantines, the Venetians and the British, the forts are architecturally interesting. A trip to the forts may turn out to be unexpectedly eerie due to their cellars, battlements and dungeons. For anyone interested in learning more about these structures, there is a museum right next to them which has some great exhibits.

A great archaeological find, Paleopolis is probably the only ancient site on the island which is still accessible by the public. Paleopolis is a large complex comprised of several structures, including Doric temples, which were dedicated to the Greek gods Poseidon and Hera. The accompanying museum houses some amazing finds from the site, such as ancient sculptures, furniture and works of art. Both the complex and the museum are some of the island's best landmarks.

Probably one of the most intriguing buildings on the island, the Achilleion is a palace just south of Corfu Town which was commissioned by the Empress of Austria in 1890. Architecturally, it is quite a find, displaying examples of both Neoclassical and Teutonic design. The house is grand, both inside and out, and a walk through the rooms provides insight into the opulence of its period of construction.

Entertainment

It is no secret that the main draw to the resort of Kavos is its thumping nightlife and entertainment scene. Dubbed the 18 to 30s island, Corfu has much to offer in terms of after-dark entertainment. The resort's evening establishments are usually filled with young Brits looking to party until sunrise.

There are several different options in the resort but the common aim among all who frequent the area's clubs is to drink plenty and stay until closing time. There is the usual assortment of nightclubs, which pump out the latest Top 40 hits. These venues are generally packed and stay open until sunrise.

For something a bit different, try the latest addition to the island - a few clubs which play exclusively 1960s, '70s and '80s music. These clubs have become popular and party-goers may even have to wait a while before being let in. For the alternative traveller, there is a host of bars which cater for rock, indie and grunge music lovers.

If tourists are simply looking for a quiet drink, they are sure to find an Irish pub or at least a Kavos equivalent. While most of the entertainment options are quite raucous, there a few bars and cocktail joints which cater for those only interested in knocking back a few drinks with friends over quiet conversation.

Dining Out

As a result of the large British tourist population which frequents the resort every year, there are few authentic Greek restaurants in Kavos. Most of the establishments in the area offer British style cuisine or fast food options including Mexican, Chinese and popular American dishes. That said, travellers who are able to find local Greek tavernas shouldn't pass up the opportunity to try a few local specialities.

The country's cuisine is Mediterranean and traces of olives, herbs and grains can be identified in most local dishes. This region in particular is also known for the good quality of its seafood due to its position in the Ionian Sea.

A dish that should not be missed is moussaka (baked eggplant layered with meat and drizzled with white sauce which browns in the oven). Souvlaki (grilled meat and vegetable on a skewer) is another delightful option, while a well-known favourite, tzatziki (yoghurt with chopped cucumber, mint and garlic served with pita bread), can be found accompanying almost all Greek meals.

The seafood in the region is of top quality as restaurants use fresh ingredients straight from the sea. Stakomacaronada (lobster with spaghetti) is an absolute must-try, while achinosalata (sea urchin eggs cooked in olive oil and lemon) makes for a delicious light meal.

Drinks also form a big part of the Greek dining experience. Whether at restaurants, bars or cafés, Greeks almost always have a local drink in hand. One of the most famous alcoholic drinks is the strong aniseed liquor called ouzo.

Beach

The main attraction for most visitors to Kavos is the resort's beach. Boasting two kilometres of white sands, it is a great place to relax and get a tan. The beach gets quite full but there are many umbrellas and sunbeds available for hire. The best time to visit Kavos Beach is in the morning, when few visitors have awoken from their slumbers and the sandy stretch is quiet.

Romance

For a bit of romance, travellers will probably need to leave the Kavos resort the charming Corfu Town. Tourists to this quaint town can have a picnic on one of its secluded beaches or simply just watch the sunset on the esplanade with a cocktail in hand. The island's hinterland offers traditional villages where visitors can dine in a rustic environment, or for luxury opt for some pampering for two at one of the island's spas.

Family

The beach in Kavos is great for families with children but once the kids tire of playing in the sand, there are several other activities on offer which should keep them occupied. Aqualand, a nearby large waterpark, is a great option. Located only an hour by car to the north of Kavos, it features myriad pools, slides, Jacuzzis and playgrounds which can lead to hours of fun.

Adventure

Those travellers seeking a bit of action and adventure should take advantage of Kavos's coastline. The resort's stretch of beach is famous for its water sports and there are many tour operators who can help you to organise activities. Whether it's waterskiing and jet-skiing or banana boating and bungee jumping, this holiday town has it covered.

Need to know

Need to know [destination]

Language

The official language in Greece is Greek, which is spoken in all regions of the country, including the resort of Kavos. The island of Corfu, on which Kavos is located, receives a large influx of British tourists every year, which has resulted in the proliferation of English being spoken across the resort. German, French and Italian are commonly spoken here as well.

Currency

Greece's official currency is the euro, which is divided into 100 cents. ATMs can be found all over the island, with all major credit and debit cards accepted. Some ATMs reject five-digit PIN codes. Currency can be exchanged at banks, hotels and automated exchange machines.

Visas

All travellers who are citizens of countries which belong to the European Union are permitted entry into the country for an unlimited period of time. The same is true for travellers coming from countries that have signed the Schengen Agreement. United Kingdom citizens do not have to undergo any border controls; they are allowed visa-free entry for a stay of unlimited duration.

Climate

The climate on the island of Corfu is temperate, with hot summers and mild winters. Summers peak in July and August, with the temperatures reaching highs of 32°C and long and sunny days. Winters, which are harshest in December, bring a great deal of rain but temperatures remain mild.

Main Airports

The country's main gateway is Athens International Airport in the country's capital. This is Greece's busiest airport. However, the airport closest to the resort of Kavos is Corfu International Airport (Ioannis Kapodistrias), which receives seasonal international services from major UK airports as well as year-round domestic flights from Athens and Thessaloniki.

Flight Options

Corfu International Airport receives seasonal EasyJet flights from London-Gatwick, London-Luton and Manchester, while Jet2.com operates seasonal routes from East Midlands, Newcastle and Leeds-Bradford. Monarch, Ryanair, Thomas Cook Airlines and Thomson Airways offer further seasonal options from the UK. Out of season, UK travellers must fly via Athens International Airport and take a connecting Aegean Airlines or Olympic Air flight to Corfu. The average flight time of a direct flight between London and Corfu is 2 hours, 50 minutes.

Travel Advice

The resort of Kavos becomes increasingly popular during the peak season in July and August and again around UK school holidays. To avoid high prices and full accommodation, it is advised to make bookings far in advance. The cheapest flights are offered by low-cost carriers such as EasyJet and Monarch, but these operators only serve Corfu seasonally.

Other Transport Options

UK travellers can reach the resort by boat if they wish. There are direct ferry links between Corfu and ports in Albania (Himara and Saranda), Italy (Venice, Ancona and Bari) and mainland Greece. Flights, trains or buses can be taken to any one of these port cities, from where boat transfer can be made to the resort.

Getting Around

Kavos resort is quite small and can mostly be navigated on foot. There are, however, several ways in which to reach other parts of the island. Buses are reliable and efficient and cover most towns on Corfu. Renting a car is simple and the roads are well-maintained but it is advised to book in advance as peak season sees vehicle availability diminish. Hiring a boat to navigate the region is an enjoyable way of seeing the sites, but plenty of boat tours are available for those who don't feel confident to drive a boat themselves. The network of boats connects Kavos with Corfu Town, Blue Lagoon, Parga and the little known islands off the coast of Kavos, Antipaxos and Paxos.

Bus

A good network of buses exists on the island of Corfu, with connections to Kavos resort and many other parts of the island. The buses are colour-coded, with blue buses operating primarily in Corfu Town and green buses operating everywhere else. The green buses serve Kavos. Blue buses can be caught in San Rocco Square in Corfu Town. Buses are efficient and on time, and schedules are readily available at all stations.

Car

Most of the international car rental agencies are spoken for, including the popular Hertz, Avis, Europcar and Budget. The roads in Kavos and on the island in general are in good condition, making trips to remote parts of the island possible. Because the island, and especially Kavos, can get very busy during peak season, it is advisable to pre-book a car rather than organise one once already in the region. Nationals from European Union countries are only required to have a national driver's licence.

Ferry

A fun and scenic way of seeing more of the island is to jump on one of the many daily boat trips. The network of boats connects Kavos with Corfu Town, Blue Lagoon, Parga and the little known islands off the coast of Kavos, Antipaxos and Paxos. Boats can either be rented in a private capacity or tours can be taken with one of the many local companies.

MAP

KAVOS`S WEATHER TODAY

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MONTHS

AVERAGE RAINFALL (mm)

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FACTS

  1. There are around 3-4 million olive trees on the island. That’s around 36 for every one of the islands 110,000 permanent inhabitants. Unsurprisingly, olive oil is one of the most important products of the island.
  2. Corfu is the second largest island in the Ionian Sea after Kefalonia. It runs 64km long and 32km wide at its widest point.
  3. The Brits have a long association with Corfu. From 1814-1864 it was under British rule and in 1921 The Duke of Edinburgh, husband to Queen Elizabeth II, was born in Mon Repos Palace in Corfu Town.

FACTS

  1. There are around 3-4 million olive trees on the island. That’s around 36 for every one of the islands 110,000 permanent inhabitants. Unsurprisingly, olive oil is one of the most important products of the island.
  2. Corfu is the second largest island in the Ionian Sea after Kefalonia. It runs 64km long and 32km wide at its widest point.
  3. The Brits have a long association with Corfu. From 1814-1864 it was under British rule and in 1921 The Duke of Edinburgh, husband to Queen Elizabeth II, was born in Mon Repos Palace in Corfu Town.

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