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Top Things To See In Tokyo

Cherry blossoms, ancient temples and all things 'kawaii' (cute): these are just some of the things to see in Tokyo, a city whose 23 districts all have something different to offer foodies, shopaholics, fashionistas and culture vultures alike. Click through our 360° views for a virtual tour of Japan’s buzzing capital.

Shibuya Crossing
  • Shibuya Crossing
  • The quintessential list of things to do in Tokyo includes a visit to Shibuya to experience Japan’s busiest crossroads. If you haven’t already seen Shibuya Crossing in photos, you might recognise it from a handful of Hollywood films. The world-famous 'scramble crossing' – a kind of crossroads where traffic lights turn red at the same time, allowing people to scramble across in all directions – is framed against the huge electronic billboards that dominate Shibuya, a shopping district known for fashion and youth culture. Shibuya Crossing is adjacent to Shibuya Station and the bronze statue of Hachiko the faithful dog, which has become a popular meeting spot.

  • The quintessential list of things to do in Tokyo includes a visit to Shibuya to experience Japan’s busiest crossroads. If you haven’t already seen Shibuya Crossing in photos, you might recognise it from a handful of Hollywood films. The world-famous 'scramble crossing' – a kind of crossroads where traffic lights turn red at the same time, allowing people to scramble across in all directions – is framed against the huge electronic billboards that dominate Shibuya, a shopping district known for fashion and youth culture. Shibuya Crossing is adjacent to Shibuya Station and the bronze statue of Hachiko the faithful dog, which has become a popular meeting spot.

  • Samurai Armour Wearing & Photo Shoot Experience in Shibuya
Mount Fuji
  • Mount Fuji
  • With its snow cap and conical shape, this 12,400-foot mountain is the highest in Japan and one of the nation’s most celebrated symbols. Picture-perfect Mount Fuji has been the nucleus of mountain worship since ancient times. Until now, mountain climbers traditionally start their journey by worshipping at Fujisan Hongu Sengen Taisha Shrine, located in Fujinomiya City, in the foothills of Mount Fuji. Go to the Asagiri Highland and take the shortest trail to the summit, or admire Mount Fuji from a viewpoint atop Shiraito Falls. A few times a year, the sun aligns with Fuji’s peak and creates the 'Diamond Fuji' spectacle that’s only visible from Lake Tanuki.

  • With its snow cap and conical shape, this 12,400-foot mountain is the highest in Japan and one of the nation’s most celebrated symbols. Picture-perfect Mount Fuji has been the nucleus of mountain worship since ancient times. Until now, mountain climbers traditionally start their journey by worshipping at Fujisan Hongu Sengen Taisha Shrine, located in Fujinomiya City, in the foothills of Mount Fuji. Go to the Asagiri Highland and take the shortest trail to the summit, or admire Mount Fuji from a viewpoint atop Shiraito Falls. A few times a year, the sun aligns with Fuji’s peak and creates the 'Diamond Fuji' spectacle that’s only visible from Lake Tanuki.

  • Mount Fuji & Hakone National Park Full-Day Tour
Sensoji Temple
  • Sensoji Temple
  • Located in the Asakusa district, Sensoji Temple was established in 628. It’s Japan’s oldest temple and one of the country’s most-visited attractions, drawing over 30 million visitors yearly. From the ancient and imposing Kaminarimon entrance gate – the symbol of Asakusa – you’ll pass through the 800-foot Nakamise shopping street, whose little shops offer souvenirs and local delicacies, to reach the temple grounds. Air raids during World War II destroyed most of the temple structures, so much of what you see today is a reconstruction. The gods who founded Sensoji Temple are enshrined in the nearby Asakusa Shrine, where the massive Sanja Matsuri festival takes place each May.

  • Located in the Asakusa district, Sensoji Temple was established in 628. It’s Japan’s oldest temple and one of the country’s most-visited attractions, drawing over 30 million visitors yearly. From the ancient and imposing Kaminarimon entrance gate – the symbol of Asakusa – you’ll pass through the 800-foot Nakamise shopping street, whose little shops offer souvenirs and local delicacies, to reach the temple grounds. Air raids during World War II destroyed most of the temple structures, so much of what you see today is a reconstruction. The gods who founded Sensoji Temple are enshrined in the nearby Asakusa Shrine, where the massive Sanja Matsuri festival takes place each May.

  • Shrine, Temple, Palace & Waterfront Full-Day Tour
Meiji Shrine
  • Meiji Shrine
  • This Shinto shrine in the Shibuya district is dedicated to the deified spirits of Emperor Meiji and the Empress Dowager Shoken. When Meiji Shrine was established in 1920, the Japanese people donated over 100,000 trees to create the wooded area that surrounds the complex. The shrine has inner and outer precincts; the latter houses the Meiji Memorial Picture Gallery, where massive murals depict events in the lives of the emperor and his wife. Most of the structures in Meiji Shrine caught fire during air raids in World War II, but the wrecked buildings were all rebuilt in the late 1950s. The sprawling Yoyogi Park is beside Meiji Shrine.

  • This Shinto shrine in the Shibuya district is dedicated to the deified spirits of Emperor Meiji and the Empress Dowager Shoken. When Meiji Shrine was established in 1920, the Japanese people donated over 100,000 trees to create the wooded area that surrounds the complex. The shrine has inner and outer precincts; the latter houses the Meiji Memorial Picture Gallery, where massive murals depict events in the lives of the emperor and his wife. Most of the structures in Meiji Shrine caught fire during air raids in World War II, but the wrecked buildings were all rebuilt in the late 1950s. The sprawling Yoyogi Park is beside Meiji Shrine.

  • Private City Tour
Akihabara District
  • Akihabara District
  • A slice of paradise for both tech-heads and otakus (pop culture fans), Tokyo’s Akihabara district began as a cluster of stores selling radio parts in the 1940s. It has since grown into a massive shopping district specialising in electronics. Geek out over the retro games and top-of-the-line gadgets on offer along the main drag, Chuo-dori Street, and don’t forget to explore the surrounding streets to see what high-tech treasures you’ll find. Akihabara is also synonymous with otaku culture, and there’s a plethora of shops selling collectibles related to manga, anime, and Japanese pop culture in general. When you need a break from shopping, you can go to character-themed cafe.

  • A slice of paradise for both tech-heads and otakus (pop culture fans), Tokyo’s Akihabara district began as a cluster of stores selling radio parts in the 1940s. It has since grown into a massive shopping district specialising in electronics. Geek out over the retro games and top-of-the-line gadgets on offer along the main drag, Chuo-dori Street, and don’t forget to explore the surrounding streets to see what high-tech treasures you’ll find. Akihabara is also synonymous with otaku culture, and there’s a plethora of shops selling collectibles related to manga, anime, and Japanese pop culture in general. When you need a break from shopping, you can go to character-themed cafe.

  • Akihabara Excursion with Sushi Lunch
Ryōgoku Kokugikan
  • Ryōgoku Kokugikan
  • The Ryogoku district is the home of sumo, Japan’s national sport. You’ll likely run into rikishi (professional sumo wrestlers) as soon as you alight at the train station. Sumo matches, including three of six official yearly tournaments, take place at the 11,000-seater Ryogoku Kokugikan. The hall also houses the Sumo Museum, where you can view sumo-related memorabilia such as tournament records, 19th-century woodblock prints and ornamental belts reserved for high-ranking rikishi. To complete the sumo experience, you can stay for a chanko nabe (hotpot) meal in the neighbourhood – these hearty dishes are the staple of a sumo wrestler’s diet.

  • The Ryogoku district is the home of sumo, Japan’s national sport. You’ll likely run into rikishi (professional sumo wrestlers) as soon as you alight at the train station. Sumo matches, including three of six official yearly tournaments, take place at the 11,000-seater Ryogoku Kokugikan. The hall also houses the Sumo Museum, where you can view sumo-related memorabilia such as tournament records, 19th-century woodblock prints and ornamental belts reserved for high-ranking rikishi. To complete the sumo experience, you can stay for a chanko nabe (hotpot) meal in the neighbourhood – these hearty dishes are the staple of a sumo wrestler’s diet.

  • Discover Hotels Near Ryogoku Kokugikan
Tokyo Tower
  • Tokyo Tower
  • Inspired by the Eiffel Tower, this 1,100-foot-tall broadcasting tower was built in 1958 and painted white and 'international orange', in compliance with air safety regulations. If you’re looking for things to see in Tokyo, the two 360-degree observation decks – one at 500 feet and another at 730 feet – have got you covered. See if you can spot the Tokyo Skytree broadcasting tower, Tokyo Bay and, if the weather’s clear, Mount Fuji in the distance. At the foot of the tower lies the aptly named FootTown, which has eateries, souvenir shops, an anime-themed indoor theme park and the Tokyo Tower Aquarium. Tokyo Tower is beautifully illuminated every evening.

  • Inspired by the Eiffel Tower, this 1,100-foot-tall broadcasting tower was built in 1958 and painted white and 'international orange', in compliance with air safety regulations. If you’re looking for things to see in Tokyo, the two 360-degree observation decks – one at 500 feet and another at 730 feet – have got you covered. See if you can spot the Tokyo Skytree broadcasting tower, Tokyo Bay and, if the weather’s clear, Mount Fuji in the distance. At the foot of the tower lies the aptly named FootTown, which has eateries, souvenir shops, an anime-themed indoor theme park and the Tokyo Tower Aquarium. Tokyo Tower is beautifully illuminated every evening.

  • Half-Day City Sightseeing Tour with Tokyo Tower Observation Deck
Shinjuku Gyoen National Garden
  • Shinjuku Gyoen National Garden
  • Tokyo can be quite an assault on the senses in the very best of ways, but when it gets a bit much, go for a long, tranquil walk in the Shinjuku Gyoen National Garden. Spanning nearly 150 acres, this green space combines three gardening styles: French formal, English landscape and traditional Japanese. You can also visit the greenhouse or look up at the Himalayan cedars towering over the lush greenery. Thanks to some 1,500 cherry trees (sakuras), the garden is a breathtaking sight when the trees bloom in the spring (though you’ll have to contend with massive crowds), but its autumn colours are no less magnificent.

  • Tokyo can be quite an assault on the senses in the very best of ways, but when it gets a bit much, go for a long, tranquil walk in the Shinjuku Gyoen National Garden. Spanning nearly 150 acres, this green space combines three gardening styles: French formal, English landscape and traditional Japanese. You can also visit the greenhouse or look up at the Himalayan cedars towering over the lush greenery. Thanks to some 1,500 cherry trees (sakuras), the garden is a breathtaking sight when the trees bloom in the spring (though you’ll have to contend with massive crowds), but its autumn colours are no less magnificent.

  • Guide to Exploring Shinjuku Gyoen National Garden
Tokyo National Museum
  • Tokyo National Museum
  • Founded in 1872, Tokyo National Museum is the oldest of Japan’s national museums. Its extensive collection of artworks and artefacts focuses on Japan – it has nearly a hundred National Treasures and over 600 Important Cultural Properties – but also includes cultural objects from across Asia. The main gallery, Honkan, showcases exhibitions from 10,000 BC to the late 19th century, and it’s just one of five exhibition buildings. Also encompassing a garden with five traditional teahouses, the Tokyo National Museum complex is situated within Ueno Park, which also houses attractions such as the National Museum of Western Art and the National Museum of Nature and Science.

  • Founded in 1872, Tokyo National Museum is the oldest of Japan’s national museums. Its extensive collection of artworks and artefacts focuses on Japan – it has nearly a hundred National Treasures and over 600 Important Cultural Properties – but also includes cultural objects from across Asia. The main gallery, Honkan, showcases exhibitions from 10,000 BC to the late 19th century, and it’s just one of five exhibition buildings. Also encompassing a garden with five traditional teahouses, the Tokyo National Museum complex is situated within Ueno Park, which also houses attractions such as the National Museum of Western Art and the National Museum of Nature and Science.

  • Tokyo National Museum

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