Rome in 360º

  • Rome

  • Share With Other Travellers

Highlights

Top Things To See In Rome

Whether you’re a history buff, an art lover, an architecture aficionado or a foodie seeking the perfect cacio e pepe, Rome’s got you covered. In fact, there are so many terrific things to see in Rome that touring the city can feel like a full-out sprint from one legendary landmark to the next. To help you get your bearings in the Eternal City, we’ve put together a guide to some of its must-see hotspots. Just click through to discover 360° views of Rome’s most beloved attractions, and you can take a virtual voyage without changing out of your slippers.

The Colosseum
  • The Colosseum
  • Over five million visitors a year head to The Colosseum to walk in the footsteps of gladiators and marvel at the largest amphitheatre ever constructed. The building is one of the most impressive ruins of the Roman Empire, and the complex is so vast – it covers six acres and has 80 entrances – that it can take a whole morning to explore all the tunnels, tiers and trapdoors. Some can’t-miss sights include the Hypogeum, the underground lair where slaves, animals and prisoners were kept before events, and the Third Tier, which provides sweeping views over the city and the arena. Visitors require a special ticket to access these levels, so make sure to book in advance.
  • Over five million visitors a year head to The Colosseum to walk in the footsteps of gladiators and marvel at the largest amphitheatre ever constructed. The building is one of the most impressive ruins of the Roman Empire, and the complex is so vast – it covers six acres and has 80 entrances – that it can take a whole morning to explore all the tunnels, tiers and trapdoors. Some can’t-miss sights include the Hypogeum, the underground lair where slaves, animals and prisoners were kept before events, and the Third Tier, which provides sweeping views over the city and the arena. Visitors require a special ticket to access these levels, so make sure to book in advance.
  • Book The Colosseum & Palatine Hill Tour!
Mausoleum of Augustus
  • Mausoleum of Augustus
  • The burial site of Rome’s first emperor, the Mausoleum of Augustus was long considered one of Imperial Rome’s most impressive feats – a fittingly lavish and ornate resting spot for one of the city’s most famous men – but it fell into disrepair over the centuries, gradually becoming a crumbling afterthought. The mausoleum is now being restored to its former glory, though, and soon it should once again resemble a shining beacon beneath the evergreens – bathed in shimmering white travertine and topped by a gold statue of Augustus, the man who defeated Cleopatra and Marc Antony. The restoration is a story well worth following.
  • The burial site of Rome’s first emperor, the Mausoleum of Augustus was long considered one of Imperial Rome’s most impressive feats – a fittingly lavish and ornate resting spot for one of the city’s most famous men – but it fell into disrepair over the centuries, gradually becoming a crumbling afterthought. The mausoleum is now being restored to its former glory, though, and soon it should once again resemble a shining beacon beneath the evergreens – bathed in shimmering white travertine and topped by a gold statue of Augustus, the man who defeated Cleopatra and Marc Antony. The restoration is a story well worth following.
  • Discover Hotels Near Augustus' Mausoleum
Capitoline Hill
  • Capitoline Hill
  • Once the seat of power for Ancient Rome, Capitoline Hill is home to Piazza del Campidoglio, one of the city’s most noteworthy squares, and is a must-see spot for visitors looking for things to do in Rome. The square was designed by Michelangelo in the 16th century, and is flanked by the Palazzo dei Conservatori and the Palazzo Nuovo, which now house the Capitoline Museums. These fascinating treasure troves are the world’s oldest national museums, and hold some of Rome’s most beloved artefacts. Of special note is the “Capitoline Wolf”, a bronze sculpture that’s become an iconic symbol of the Eternal City.
  • Once the seat of power for Ancient Rome, Capitoline Hill is home to Piazza del Campidoglio, one of the city’s most noteworthy squares, and is a must-see spot for visitors looking for things to do in Rome. The square was designed by Michelangelo in the 16th century, and is flanked by the Palazzo dei Conservatori and the Palazzo Nuovo, which now house the Capitoline Museums. These fascinating treasure troves are the world’s oldest national museums, and hold some of Rome’s most beloved artefacts. Of special note is the “Capitoline Wolf”, a bronze sculpture that’s become an iconic symbol of the Eternal City.
  • Scholar-Led Skip-the-Line Colosseum & Rome's Archaeology
Imperial Forums
  • Imperial Forums
  • Situated between the imposing Colosseum and the Vittorio Emanuele II monument, the Imperial Forums are a series of stunning, mostly ruined piazzas that were once at the heart of Roman rule. The buildings date from between 46 BC and 113 AD, and the sight of the Trajan’s Column rising above the bustle of the modern city is breathtaking. Although not much remains of most of the buildings, Trajan’s Market can still be seen, as can some of Caesar’s Forums. To get the most out of a stroll around the grounds, brush up on the area’s history at the Museums of Imperial Fora, located at Trajan’s Markets.
  • Situated between the imposing Colosseum and the Vittorio Emanuele II monument, the Imperial Forums are a series of stunning, mostly ruined piazzas that were once at the heart of Roman rule. The buildings date from between 46 BC and 113 AD, and the sight of the Trajan’s Column rising above the bustle of the modern city is breathtaking. Although not much remains of most of the buildings, Trajan’s Market can still be seen, as can some of Caesar’s Forums. To get the most out of a stroll around the grounds, brush up on the area’s history at the Museums of Imperial Fora, located at Trajan’s Markets.
  • Guide to Exploring Roman Forum
St. Peter's Basilica
  • St. Peter's Basilica
  • There’s a reason why St. Peter’s Basilica draws visitors from around the world, no matter their religious affiliation; this is an awe-inspiring monument to human achievement, the foremost example of exquisite Renaissance architecture, and the home of Michelangelo’s iconic “Pieta”. The dome (also the work of Michelangelo) is the largest in the world, and the interiors beneath it are so stunning that they rank amongst the most impressive in Christendom. Some of the church’s must-see attractions include the altar adorned with Bernini’s solid-gold canopy, and Arnolfo di Cambio's statue of St. Peter. Visitors who climb to the top of the cupola will also be rewarded with stunning views of the city.
  • There’s a reason why St. Peter’s Basilica draws visitors from around the world, no matter their religious affiliation; this is an awe-inspiring monument to human achievement, the foremost example of exquisite Renaissance architecture, and the home of Michelangelo’s iconic “Pieta”. The dome (also the work of Michelangelo) is the largest in the world, and the interiors beneath it are so stunning that they rank amongst the most impressive in Christendom. Some of the church’s must-see attractions include the altar adorned with Bernini’s solid-gold canopy, and Arnolfo di Cambio's statue of St. Peter. Visitors who climb to the top of the cupola will also be rewarded with stunning views of the city.
  • St. Peter's Basilica & Dome Tour
St. Peter's Square
  • St. Peter's Square
  • St. Peter’s Basilica is one of the world’s great attractions, but the piazza outside it is nearly as impressive. The square is rich in history – an Egyptian obelisk brought by Caligula in 37 BC marks the spot where Christians were martyred, and Bernini designed his majestic colonnade around it. Those who visit at night will find that the lamp-lit Via della Conciliazione offers a romantic backdrop for photographs – you can even straddle the line between two countries – while travellers who come in the morning may find themselves face to face with the Pope, who addresses general audiences on Wednesdays.
  • St. Peter’s Basilica is one of the world’s great attractions, but the piazza outside it is nearly as impressive. The square is rich in history – an Egyptian obelisk brought by Caligula in 37 BC marks the spot where Christians were martyred, and Bernini designed his majestic colonnade around it. Those who visit at night will find that the lamp-lit Via della Conciliazione offers a romantic backdrop for photographs – you can even straddle the line between two countries – while travellers who come in the morning may find themselves face to face with the Pope, who addresses general audiences on Wednesdays.
  • Guide to Exploring St. Peter's Square
The Pantheon
  • The Pantheon
  • A favourite of architects the world over (it’s been called the world’s only perfect building), The Pantheon is one of ancient Rome’s most stunning feats of engineering. Michelangelo claimed that the Pantheon looked as if angels had designed it, and even the most jaded of modern visitors will find themselves speechless while standing on the marble floor and gazing at the Corinthian columns, the tomb of Raphael, the enormous dome and the sun slanting through its oculus. It’s a true treasure that’s worth checking out any time, but it’s also still a functioning church, and visitors can stop by on Sundays to hear Mass.
  • A favourite of architects the world over (it’s been called the world’s only perfect building), The Pantheon is one of ancient Rome’s most stunning feats of engineering. Michelangelo claimed that the Pantheon looked as if angels had designed it, and even the most jaded of modern visitors will find themselves speechless while standing on the marble floor and gazing at the Corinthian columns, the tomb of Raphael, the enormous dome and the sun slanting through its oculus. It’s a true treasure that’s worth checking out any time, but it’s also still a functioning church, and visitors can stop by on Sundays to hear Mass.
  • Guide to Exploring Pantheon
Sistine Chapel
  • Sistine Chapel
  • Saving the best for last, the Sistine Chapel is the final stop on a tour of the Vatican Museums, and has been awing audiences and drawing crowds for five centuries. Michelangelo is the biggest attraction here, and his celebrated ceiling frescoes were, unbelievably, his first attempts at painting. The chapel is also adorned with artwork by luminaries such as Botticelli, Rosselli and Perugino, making for one of the city’s most vibrant displays of Renaissance art. The Sistine Chapel is one of Rome’s busiest attractions and navigating the crowds can be a challenge, so it might be worth booking a tour. Alternatively, take a 360° journey by clicking above.
  • Saving the best for last, the Sistine Chapel is the final stop on a tour of the Vatican Museums, and has been awing audiences and drawing crowds for five centuries. Michelangelo is the biggest attraction here, and his celebrated ceiling frescoes were, unbelievably, his first attempts at painting. The chapel is also adorned with artwork by luminaries such as Botticelli, Rosselli and Perugino, making for one of the city’s most vibrant displays of Renaissance art. The Sistine Chapel is one of Rome’s busiest attractions and navigating the crowds can be a challenge, so it might be worth booking a tour. Alternatively, take a 360° journey by clicking above.
  • Early-Access Sistine Chapel Viewing & Vatican Museum Ticket
Trevi Fountain
  • Trevi Fountain
  • One of Rome’s great cultural landmarks, the Trevi Fountain will forever be linked with a frolicking Anita Ekburg, Marcello Mastroianni and La Dolce Vita, and was draped in black cloth to mark Mastroianni’s death. But the fountain’s origins stretch all the way back to 1762, when it was designed by Nicola Salvi, and it has long been considered one of the city’s most whimsical – and most romantic – spots. Tradition calls for visitors to throw a coin into the fountain for good luck, and the money raised is donated to Roman charities.
  • One of Rome’s great cultural landmarks, the Trevi Fountain will forever be linked with a frolicking Anita Ekburg, Marcello Mastroianni and La Dolce Vita, and was draped in black cloth to mark Mastroianni’s death. But the fountain’s origins stretch all the way back to 1762, when it was designed by Nicola Salvi, and it has long been considered one of the city’s most whimsical – and most romantic – spots. Tradition calls for visitors to throw a coin into the fountain for good luck, and the money raised is donated to Roman charities.
  • Discover Hotels Near Trevi Fountain

Plan Your Trip With Expedia