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Top Things To See In Prague

Prague is filled with classic cafes, colourful quarters and captivating castles, and when strolling the winding cobblestone streets it sometimes feels like there’s a fairytale waiting around every corner. In fact, there are so many stunning things to see in Prague that it helps to get a sense of the city’s layout in advance. We’ve put together a guide to some of Prague’s most noteworthy attractions, complete with 360° views that allow you to explore the city’s nooks and crannies, so that you can put together a streamlined itinerary for the perfect visit. Just click on through to chart your own digital journey.

Old Town Square
  • Old Town Square
  • Nestled between Charles Bridge and Wenceslas Square, the Old Town Square offers a great introduction to the charms of classical Prague. The Old Town Hall is a notable attraction for architecture buffs, as is its astronomical clock, which dates from 1410. A memorial in front of the Old Town Hall was erected in memory of the 27 martyrs beheaded at the spot by the Habsburgs, and the pavement is marked with crosses in their honour. The square is especially popular at Christmas and Easter, when bustling markets draw visitors from around the country.
  • Nestled between Charles Bridge and Wenceslas Square, the Old Town Square offers a great introduction to the charms of classical Prague. The Old Town Hall is a notable attraction for architecture buffs, as is its astronomical clock, which dates from 1410. A memorial in front of the Old Town Hall was erected in memory of the 27 martyrs beheaded at the spot by the Habsburgs, and the pavement is marked with crosses in their honour. The square is especially popular at Christmas and Easter, when bustling markets draw visitors from around the country.
  • Get Your Prague City Pass!
Charles Bridge
  • Charles Bridge
  • The elegant 15th-century Charles Bridge spans the Vltava river, and is one of the Czech Republic’s most beloved spots. The bridge connects the Old Town to Malá Strana, and is a breezy way to travel between the banks. The Charles is completely pedestrianised and has become something of a hotspot for street artists and souvenir sellers, so stroll across first thing in the morning to have the bridge all to yourself, or at sunset to catch a breathtaking view of Prague Castle backdropped by a fiery sky. As you pass, make sure to rub the statue of St John of Nepomuk for good luck.
  • The elegant 15th-century Charles Bridge spans the Vltava river, and is one of the Czech Republic’s most beloved spots. The bridge connects the Old Town to Malá Strana, and is a breezy way to travel between the banks. The Charles is completely pedestrianised and has become something of a hotspot for street artists and souvenir sellers, so stroll across first thing in the morning to have the bridge all to yourself, or at sunset to catch a breathtaking view of Prague Castle backdropped by a fiery sky. As you pass, make sure to rub the statue of St John of Nepomuk for good luck.
  • Guided Prague City Tour with Coffee Break
Prague Castle
  • Prague Castle
  • Prague Castle looms over the 8th-century neighbourhood of Malá Strana, across the Vltava from the Old Town. It’s a picturesque area of cobbled alleys, old pubs and ancient Burgher houses, and Prague Castle – the largest castle in Europe – provides a suitably noble presence. The castle dates from 800 AD and is still the seat of the Czech president, as well as the country’s biggest tourist attraction. Perhaps the most famous building in the castle complex is the St Vitus Cathedral, but Vladislav Hall, the Powder Tower, the Golden Lane and the Basilica of St. George are also well worth a look.
  • Prague Castle looms over the 8th-century neighbourhood of Malá Strana, across the Vltava from the Old Town. It’s a picturesque area of cobbled alleys, old pubs and ancient Burgher houses, and Prague Castle – the largest castle in Europe – provides a suitably noble presence. The castle dates from 800 AD and is still the seat of the Czech president, as well as the country’s biggest tourist attraction. Perhaps the most famous building in the castle complex is the St Vitus Cathedral, but Vladislav Hall, the Powder Tower, the Golden Lane and the Basilica of St. George are also well worth a look.
  • The Ultimate Tour of Prague
St. Vitus Cathedral
  • St. Vitus Cathedral
  • St Vitus Cathedral is the most recognisable part of Prague Castle – a stunning building that was constructed over the course of 600 years, and which can easily be counted amongst Central Europe’s most noteworthy landmarks. The cathedral is rich with historic treasures, including the tombs of St Wenceslas, Charles IV and St John of Nepomuk, as well as stained-glass windows designed by Alfons Mucha. The chapel has been the coronation grounds for a number of kings and queens, and the Bohemian crown jewels lay locked away in a secret chamber. Visitors can enter some parts of St Vitus for free, while others are accessible by booking a tour.
  • St Vitus Cathedral is the most recognisable part of Prague Castle – a stunning building that was constructed over the course of 600 years, and which can easily be counted amongst Central Europe’s most noteworthy landmarks. The cathedral is rich with historic treasures, including the tombs of St Wenceslas, Charles IV and St John of Nepomuk, as well as stained-glass windows designed by Alfons Mucha. The chapel has been the coronation grounds for a number of kings and queens, and the Bohemian crown jewels lay locked away in a secret chamber. Visitors can enter some parts of St Vitus for free, while others are accessible by booking a tour.
  • Discover Hotels Near St. Vitus Cathedral
National Theatre
  • National Theatre
  • Set inside a gorgeous neo-Renaissance building by the Vltava river, the National Theatre is a moving monument to Czech culture, and has been a great place to catch live performances since 1883. The theatre is marked by a shimmering golden roof, luxe interiors inspired by Slavic myth, and a number of impressive statues, including two rooftop Triga sculptures. The country’s rich cultural heritage is still on full display, as the theatre hosts the State Opera Orchestra, along with a range of drama, ballet and classical music performances. Weekend tours are offered, but why not take a virtual sneak peak above?
  • Set inside a gorgeous neo-Renaissance building by the Vltava river, the National Theatre is a moving monument to Czech culture, and has been a great place to catch live performances since 1883. The theatre is marked by a shimmering golden roof, luxe interiors inspired by Slavic myth, and a number of impressive statues, including two rooftop Triga sculptures. The country’s rich cultural heritage is still on full display, as the theatre hosts the State Opera Orchestra, along with a range of drama, ballet and classical music performances. Weekend tours are offered, but why not take a virtual sneak peak above?
  • Full-Day Sightseeing Tour with Cruise & Lunch
Dancing House
  • Dancing House
  • Although it’s been described by some as looking like it’s been left out in the sun too long, Prague’s famous Dancing House, or “Tančící dům”, is actually based on legendary dancers Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers. Indeed, it looks like the building has been caught in the middle of a big musical number, mischievously bending around the Rašínovo Embankment while the neighbouring Baroque and Gothic buildings stoically look on. The Gehry-designed building is certainly worth a visit for architecture buffs, and it also houses an upscale restaurant with a terrace offering sweeping views across the Vltava River.
  • Although it’s been described by some as looking like it’s been left out in the sun too long, Prague’s famous Dancing House, or “Tančící dům”, is actually based on legendary dancers Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers. Indeed, it looks like the building has been caught in the middle of a big musical number, mischievously bending around the Rašínovo Embankment while the neighbouring Baroque and Gothic buildings stoically look on. The Gehry-designed building is certainly worth a visit for architecture buffs, and it also houses an upscale restaurant with a terrace offering sweeping views across the Vltava River.
  • Guide to Exploring Prague Dancing House
Prague Astronomical Clock
  • Prague Astronomical Clock
  • Situated on the southern wall of The Old Town Hall in Staré Město, the Prague Astronomical Clock is the third oldest astronomical clock in the world, dating from 1410. It’s easy to find the iconic timepiece, as crowds flock to it every hour, and watching the figure of Death mark the time as the clock’s 12 apostles parade past is as much a part of visiting Prague as taking a selfie on the Charles Bridge or catching an opera at the National Theatre. The clock makes for a fantastic photo, and its location on the square puts it within easy reach of the best of old Prague.
  • Situated on the southern wall of The Old Town Hall in Staré Město, the Prague Astronomical Clock is the third oldest astronomical clock in the world, dating from 1410. It’s easy to find the iconic timepiece, as crowds flock to it every hour, and watching the figure of Death mark the time as the clock’s 12 apostles parade past is as much a part of visiting Prague as taking a selfie on the Charles Bridge or catching an opera at the National Theatre. The clock makes for a fantastic photo, and its location on the square puts it within easy reach of the best of old Prague.
  • Guide to Exploring Astronomical Clock
Jewish Quarter
  • Jewish Quarter
  • Dating from the 13th century, Josefov, or the Jewish Quarter, is situated between the Vltava River and Staré Město. The district is one of Europe’s best-preserved Jewish ghettos, and is full of historic synagogues (including the Jewish Ceremonial Hall and the Spanish synagogue), Art Nouveau buildings and old-world bars. Kafka was born here, and you can find a plaque marking his former home at the corner of Maiselova and Kaprova, as well as a statue of the writer on Dusni Street. The quarter is also home to the fascinating Jewish Cemetery, the Museum of Decorative Arts, and the Old-New Synagogue – the oldest synagogue in Central Europe.
  • Dating from the 13th century, Josefov, or the Jewish Quarter, is situated between the Vltava River and Staré Město. The district is one of Europe’s best-preserved Jewish ghettos, and is full of historic synagogues (including the Jewish Ceremonial Hall and the Spanish synagogue), Art Nouveau buildings and old-world bars. Kafka was born here, and you can find a plaque marking his former home at the corner of Maiselova and Kaprova, as well as a statue of the writer on Dusni Street. The quarter is also home to the fascinating Jewish Cemetery, the Museum of Decorative Arts, and the Old-New Synagogue – the oldest synagogue in Central Europe.
  • Learn More About Old Jewish Cemetery
St. Nicholas Church
  • St. Nicholas Church
  • Set on the main square in Malá Strana (or “The Smaller Town”), the baroque St Nicholas Church is one of Prague’s most remarkable buildings, and has been providing a haven for worship since 1735. The church features a 4000-pipe organ once played by Mozart, and its ornate and distinctive interior – once destroyed by order of emperor Josef II – was painstakingly restored by Czech soldiers in WWII. Today, St Nicholas is not only one of the city’s most popular places for religious services, it’s also a prime venue for classical concerts.
  • Set on the main square in Malá Strana (or “The Smaller Town”), the baroque St Nicholas Church is one of Prague’s most remarkable buildings, and has been providing a haven for worship since 1735. The church features a 4000-pipe organ once played by Mozart, and its ornate and distinctive interior – once destroyed by order of emperor Josef II – was painstakingly restored by Czech soldiers in WWII. Today, St Nicholas is not only one of the city’s most popular places for religious services, it’s also a prime venue for classical concerts.
  • Guide to Exploring St. Nicholas Church

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