Munich in 360º

  • Munich

  • Share With Other Travellers

Highlights

Top Things To Do In Munich

Munich might be best known for the annual Oktoberfest, but there are more things to see in Bavaria’s capital than its beer halls. Click through our 360° views for a virtual tour of Munich’s top tourist attractions, including its main square and the most awe-inspiring palaces built by the Wittelsbach dynasty.

Nymphenburg Palace
  • Nymphenburg Palace
  • The Baroque 'Castle of the Nymphs' was the summer residence of Bavaria’s Wittelsbach rulers. Over five generations, the monarchs expanded Nymphenburg Palace, which is now one of the most-visited attractions in Munich. After seeing the palace’s lavish interiors, you can visit the museums on the grounds, such as the porcelain and royal carriage museums in the South Wing, and the Museum of Man and Nature in the North Wing. Then there’s the 200-hectare park and its pavilions. One of them, the Amalienburg, ranks among the finest examples of European Rococo; the intricate hall of mirrors in this hunting lodge is a must-see.

  • The Baroque 'Castle of the Nymphs' was the summer residence of Bavaria’s Wittelsbach rulers. Over five generations, the monarchs expanded Nymphenburg Palace, which is now one of the most-visited attractions in Munich. After seeing the palace’s lavish interiors, you can visit the museums on the grounds, such as the porcelain and royal carriage museums in the South Wing, and the Museum of Man and Nature in the North Wing. Then there’s the 200-hectare park and its pavilions. One of them, the Amalienburg, ranks among the finest examples of European Rococo; the intricate hall of mirrors in this hunting lodge is a must-see.

  • Hop-On Hop-Off City Tour
Residenz
  • Residenz
  • Previously the home of Bavarian royalty, the magnificent Residenz palace is now one of the region’s largest museums. Throughout its 130 rooms, you can ooh and ahh at a remarkable array of tapestries, paintings, furniture and the prized possessions of its former residents. The fresco-filled Antiquarium is said to be the most striking Renaissance hall north of the Alps, while the Treasury of the Residence contains goldsmiths’ works, royal jewels and other valuable relics. The Residenz features a mix of architectural styles, including Renaissance, Baroque and Rococo. What you see today is mostly a reconstruction, since much of the palace was destroyed during World War II.

  • Previously the home of Bavarian royalty, the magnificent Residenz palace is now one of the region’s largest museums. Throughout its 130 rooms, you can ooh and ahh at a remarkable array of tapestries, paintings, furniture and the prized possessions of its former residents. The fresco-filled Antiquarium is said to be the most striking Renaissance hall north of the Alps, while the Treasury of the Residence contains goldsmiths’ works, royal jewels and other valuable relics. The Residenz features a mix of architectural styles, including Renaissance, Baroque and Rococo. What you see today is mostly a reconstruction, since much of the palace was destroyed during World War II.

  • Residenz Serenade Concert
Viktualienmarkt
  • Viktualienmarkt
  • Whether you’re hankering for exotic meat, tasty sausages, rare spices or artisanal cheeses, you’ll find something interesting at the Viktualienmarkt, just a few blocks from the Marienplatz. What started as a farmers' market has grown into a sprawling gastronomic wonderland, where 140 shops offer gourmet food, as well as refreshments, fresh produce and flowers. There’s a beer garden, of course, as well as restaurants and bakeshops. In Bavaria, maypoles traditionally represented villages and indicated the trades and crafts of that locale. You’ll find one such maypole in the centre of the Viktualienmarkt, with scenes depicting breweries, carousels and music.

  • Whether you’re hankering for exotic meat, tasty sausages, rare spices or artisanal cheeses, you’ll find something interesting at the Viktualienmarkt, just a few blocks from the Marienplatz. What started as a farmers' market has grown into a sprawling gastronomic wonderland, where 140 shops offer gourmet food, as well as refreshments, fresh produce and flowers. There’s a beer garden, of course, as well as restaurants and bakeshops. In Bavaria, maypoles traditionally represented villages and indicated the trades and crafts of that locale. You’ll find one such maypole in the centre of the Viktualienmarkt, with scenes depicting breweries, carousels and music.

  • Bavarian Food Tasting at Viktualienmarkt with Brunch
Marienplatz
  • Marienplatz
  • Munich’s main square got its moniker from the Mariensäule, a monument topped by the statue of the Virgin Mary, revered as the patron and protector of Bavaria. Standing in the centre of the square, this Marian column was built in 1638 to celebrate the end of Swedish occupation. The Marienplatz is home to the New City Hall, constructed in the Gothic Revival style at the turn of the 19th century, and the Old City Hall, which now functions as a council hall. Besides being an ideal starting point for sightseeing, the square is a popular meeting place and the site of Munich’s yearly Christmas Market.

  • Munich’s main square got its moniker from the Mariensäule, a monument topped by the statue of the Virgin Mary, revered as the patron and protector of Bavaria. Standing in the centre of the square, this Marian column was built in 1638 to celebrate the end of Swedish occupation. The Marienplatz is home to the New City Hall, constructed in the Gothic Revival style at the turn of the 19th century, and the Old City Hall, which now functions as a council hall. Besides being an ideal starting point for sightseeing, the square is a popular meeting place and the site of Munich’s yearly Christmas Market.

  • Private City-Centre Walking Tour
Hofbrauhaus
  • Hofbrauhaus
  • The world’s most famous beer hall is located on the Platzl, the centre of Munich’s old city. Bavaria’s Duke Maximilian I himself had the Hofbrauhaus built in 1589 as an extension of the state-owned Royal Brewery in Munich. Today, it’s a massive restaurant with stately rooms and striking features. You can enjoy a tipple under the cross vaults and elaborate ceilings on the ground floor, where beer used to be brewed, or under the shade of old chestnut trees in the beer garden. As you enter the Hofbrauhaus, turn to your left and you’ll see the 424 mug lockers where privileged patrons store their steins.

  • The world’s most famous beer hall is located on the Platzl, the centre of Munich’s old city. Bavaria’s Duke Maximilian I himself had the Hofbrauhaus built in 1589 as an extension of the state-owned Royal Brewery in Munich. Today, it’s a massive restaurant with stately rooms and striking features. You can enjoy a tipple under the cross vaults and elaborate ceilings on the ground floor, where beer used to be brewed, or under the shade of old chestnut trees in the beer garden. As you enter the Hofbrauhaus, turn to your left and you’ll see the 424 mug lockers where privileged patrons store their steins.

  • Famous Beer Halls Walking Tour
Frauenkirche
  • Frauenkirche
  • This 15th-century Gothic cathedral, with its distinctive onion domes, is an important symbol of Munich. Its full name translates to 'Cathedral of Our Lady', but locals simply call it Frauenkirche. Air strikes destroyed much of the church during World War II – it was later rebuilt – but one feature that didn’t take a hit is a dark shoeprint shape at the entrance of Frauenkirche. There are several versions of the legend surrounding this marking, which is said to be the 'Devil's Footstep'. There’s a tomb of Bavarial royals under the chancel, while the south tower is an accessible viewpoint of the city and the Alps.

  • This 15th-century Gothic cathedral, with its distinctive onion domes, is an important symbol of Munich. Its full name translates to 'Cathedral of Our Lady', but locals simply call it Frauenkirche. Air strikes destroyed much of the church during World War II – it was later rebuilt – but one feature that didn’t take a hit is a dark shoeprint shape at the entrance of Frauenkirche. There are several versions of the legend surrounding this marking, which is said to be the 'Devil's Footstep'. There’s a tomb of Bavarial royals under the chancel, while the south tower is an accessible viewpoint of the city and the Alps.

  • Guide to Exploring Church of Our Lady
Dachau Concentration Camp
  • Dachau Concentration Camp
  • The KZ-Gedenkstätte Dachau Concentration Camp Memorial Site stands on the grounds where, from 1933 to 1945, over 200,000 people from various parts of Europe were imprisoned in the first Nazi concentration camp. Things to do at the site include seeing the exhibitions, which contain narratives and drawings of former prisoners, and visiting the only remaining bunker, the roll-call square and reconstructed barracks where the prisoners slept. You can also peruse the information panels lining the 1.8-mile Path of Remembrance, which leads from Dachau railway station to the Visitors’ Centre at the memorial site, and marks the route prisoners had to take to get to the camp.

  • The KZ-Gedenkstätte Dachau Concentration Camp Memorial Site stands on the grounds where, from 1933 to 1945, over 200,000 people from various parts of Europe were imprisoned in the first Nazi concentration camp. Things to do at the site include seeing the exhibitions, which contain narratives and drawings of former prisoners, and visiting the only remaining bunker, the roll-call square and reconstructed barracks where the prisoners slept. You can also peruse the information panels lining the 1.8-mile Path of Remembrance, which leads from Dachau railway station to the Visitors’ Centre at the memorial site, and marks the route prisoners had to take to get to the camp.

  • Dachau Concentration Camp Memorial Tour
Neuschwanstein Castle
  • Neuschwanstein Castle
  • Disneyland’s iconic Sleeping Beauty Castle was modelled after Neuschwanstein Castle, a Neo-Romanesque palace atop rugged cliffs. The lavish castle was built by Ludwig II, nicknamed the 'Fairy Tale King', who envisioned it to be a personal retreat whose beauty would surpass all his other palaces. However, Neuschwanstein Castle was never finished during Ludwig II’s lifetime, and it was opened to the public in 1886, less than a month after his passing. Over 1.3 million visitors tour Neuschwanstein Castle every year. For the best views of its facade, head for the Marienbrücke, a bridge over the Pollät Gorge.

  • Disneyland’s iconic Sleeping Beauty Castle was modelled after Neuschwanstein Castle, a Neo-Romanesque palace atop rugged cliffs. The lavish castle was built by Ludwig II, nicknamed the 'Fairy Tale King', who envisioned it to be a personal retreat whose beauty would surpass all his other palaces. However, Neuschwanstein Castle was never finished during Ludwig II’s lifetime, and it was opened to the public in 1886, less than a month after his passing. Over 1.3 million visitors tour Neuschwanstein Castle every year. For the best views of its facade, head for the Marienbrücke, a bridge over the Pollät Gorge.

  • Skip-the-Line Neuschwanstein Castle Tour by Train
English Garden
  • English Garden
  • Frequented by sunbathers, joggers and cyclists, the English Garden is an expansive public park – one of the largest in the world – established in 1789 by Sir Benjamin Thompson. Its name came from the eponymous landscaping style that was popular in England at the time, characterised by rolling lawns, groves of trees and a lake. Munich’s version naturally houses a few beer gardens, including one at Kleinhesseloher Lake. The beer garden at the 82-foot-high Chinese Tower is the second largest in the city. You’ll also find a Japanese teahouse and garden, a clothing-optional meadow and the Monopteros, a Greek-style hilltop temple that offers great views of Munich.

  • Frequented by sunbathers, joggers and cyclists, the English Garden is an expansive public park – one of the largest in the world – established in 1789 by Sir Benjamin Thompson. Its name came from the eponymous landscaping style that was popular in England at the time, characterised by rolling lawns, groves of trees and a lake. Munich’s version naturally houses a few beer gardens, including one at Kleinhesseloher Lake. The beer garden at the 82-foot-high Chinese Tower is the second largest in the city. You’ll also find a Japanese teahouse and garden, a clothing-optional meadow and the Monopteros, a Greek-style hilltop temple that offers great views of Munich.

  • Full-Day Bicycle Hire

Plan Your Trip With Expedia