Lisbon in 360º

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Highlights

Top Things To See In Lisbon

From the romantic fado bars atop the hills of Bairro Alto, to the labyrinthine lanes of ancient Alfama and the vertiginous skyscrapers in Parque das Nações, there are plenty of thrilling things to see in Lisbon. This charming city is a blend of modernity and tradition, where winding streets lead onto grand adventures and you never know what’s around the next corner. To help you get to grips with the mysteries of legendary Lisbon, we’ve put together virtual guides to some of the city’s most notable attractions. Just click on through to explore 360° views of a range of landmarks, and you can stake out the setting for your next big escape.

Bairro Alto
  • Bairro Alto
  • The winding streets of Bairro Alto – perched high above the city centre – may be tranquil during the day, but at night they come alive with the bustle of visitors and locals, who come to snack on bacalhau in the maze of lamp-lit cafes, and to hit the traditional fado bars encircling the Rua do Diário de Notícias. That’s not to say that Bairro Alto isn’t worth visiting before dark – it’s peppered with quaint eateries, churches, museums and boutiques – it’s just that its reputation as the epicentre of Lisbon nightlife is well earned. If possible, try to catch the sunset from Miradouro de Santa Catarina – it’s a stunning sight.
  • The winding streets of Bairro Alto – perched high above the city centre – may be tranquil during the day, but at night they come alive with the bustle of visitors and locals, who come to snack on bacalhau in the maze of lamp-lit cafes, and to hit the traditional fado bars encircling the Rua do Diário de Notícias. That’s not to say that Bairro Alto isn’t worth visiting before dark – it’s peppered with quaint eateries, churches, museums and boutiques – it’s just that its reputation as the epicentre of Lisbon nightlife is well earned. If possible, try to catch the sunset from Miradouro de Santa Catarina – it’s a stunning sight.
  • Get Your Lisbon Card!
Alfama
  • Alfama
  • If you’re looking for things to do in Lisbon, take a stroll to Alfama, a hillside neighbourhood bursting with charming churches, labyrinthine cobblestone streets and eclectic cafes. Alfama is the perfect place to spend an afternoon shopping for handmade crafts, sampling barbecued fish sold in the gardens of the ancient houses, and taking in the stunning views over the waterfront. History buffs can climb to the top of the hill to explore the ancient Moorish castle, while night owls can journey to Alfama in the evening, when the fado clubs come to life and stars fill the skies above the Portas do Sol.
  • If you’re looking for things to do in Lisbon, take a stroll to Alfama, a hillside neighbourhood bursting with charming churches, labyrinthine cobblestone streets and eclectic cafes. Alfama is the perfect place to spend an afternoon shopping for handmade crafts, sampling barbecued fish sold in the gardens of the ancient houses, and taking in the stunning views over the waterfront. History buffs can climb to the top of the hill to explore the ancient Moorish castle, while night owls can journey to Alfama in the evening, when the fado clubs come to life and stars fill the skies above the Portas do Sol.
  • Get The Alfama Travel Package!
Arco de la Rua Augusta
  • Arco de la Rua Augusta
  • Looming above the bustling pedestrianised street of Rua Augusta, this magnificent arch not only stands as a memorial to a portion of the city destroyed by natural disaster in the 18th century, its platform offers amazing views across Praça Do Comércio and the Baixa district. A journey to the top of the arch is well worth the effort, as visitors can see the magnificent city spreading out beneath them (make sure to bring a camera), and admire Célestin Anatole Calmels’s statues of Glory, Valour and Genius. The arch’s clock room also houses an exhibition covering the history of the monument.
  • Looming above the bustling pedestrianised street of Rua Augusta, this magnificent arch not only stands as a memorial to a portion of the city destroyed by natural disaster in the 18th century, its platform offers amazing views across Praça Do Comércio and the Baixa district. A journey to the top of the arch is well worth the effort, as visitors can see the magnificent city spreading out beneath them (make sure to bring a camera), and admire Célestin Anatole Calmels’s statues of Glory, Valour and Genius. The arch’s clock room also houses an exhibition covering the history of the monument.
  • Small-Group Lisbon Bike Tour with Local Food & Drink Tastings
Praça Do Comércio
  • Praça Do Comércio
  • Shadowed by the magnificent Arco de la Rua Augusta monument, Praça Do Comércio is one of the city’s grandest spaces, and one of the biggest city squares in Europe. The plaza’s name derives from the palace that adorned it before being lost in the earthquake of 1755, but the square’s regal trappings still live on in its beautiful arcades, canary-coloured buildings and stoic statue of King José I. The Praça Do Comércio is conveniently located near numerous transport links, making it a buzzy hub for visitors, and its also close to the Pátio da Galé venue and the Cais das Colunas – a pair of columns marking the Tagus river.
  • Shadowed by the magnificent Arco de la Rua Augusta monument, Praça Do Comércio is one of the city’s grandest spaces, and one of the biggest city squares in Europe. The plaza’s name derives from the palace that adorned it before being lost in the earthquake of 1755, but the square’s regal trappings still live on in its beautiful arcades, canary-coloured buildings and stoic statue of King José I. The Praça Do Comércio is conveniently located near numerous transport links, making it a buzzy hub for visitors, and its also close to the Pátio da Galé venue and the Cais das Colunas – a pair of columns marking the Tagus river.
  • Guide to Exploring Commerce Square
Mosteiro dos Jerónimos
  • Mosteiro dos Jerónimos
  • Situated in the historic district of Belem, the Mosteiro dos Jerónimos monastery has long been associated with the Order of Saint Jerome, a group of monks who prayed for seafarers, explorers, and all kinds of wayward voyagers who put their life on the line in order to discover new horizons. Indeed, legendary explorer Vasco de Gama is said to have spent his last night in Mosteiro dos Jerónimos before his voyage to the Far East, and he’s now interred in the lower chancel. Today the monastery still dazzles; check out the ornate Manueline cloisters, the ornamental altar and the Renaissance carvings.
  • Situated in the historic district of Belem, the Mosteiro dos Jerónimos monastery has long been associated with the Order of Saint Jerome, a group of monks who prayed for seafarers, explorers, and all kinds of wayward voyagers who put their life on the line in order to discover new horizons. Indeed, legendary explorer Vasco de Gama is said to have spent his last night in Mosteiro dos Jerónimos before his voyage to the Far East, and he’s now interred in the lower chancel. Today the monastery still dazzles; check out the ornate Manueline cloisters, the ornamental altar and the Renaissance carvings.
  • Hop-On Hop-Off Bus & Hills Tramcar Tour
Belém Tower
  • Belém Tower
  • Constructed to protect Lisbon from marauding pirates, Belém Tower still stoically watches over the charming and historic Belem district, 1.5 miles from Lisbon’s bustling city centre. The tower is most notable for its intricate façade, which feature Moorish watchtowers, Manueline stone details and a rare carving of a rhinoceros. The tower’s somewhat modest interior showcases its almost monastic functionality, but the views of the Tagus river from the top of the tower are fantastic. Belém Tower offers free admission on Sundays, and alternatively, you can take a 360° virtual wander around the landmark here.
  • Constructed to protect Lisbon from marauding pirates, Belém Tower still stoically watches over the charming and historic Belem district, 1.5 miles from Lisbon’s bustling city centre. The tower is most notable for its intricate façade, which feature Moorish watchtowers, Manueline stone details and a rare carving of a rhinoceros. The tower’s somewhat modest interior showcases its almost monastic functionality, but the views of the Tagus river from the top of the tower are fantastic. Belém Tower offers free admission on Sundays, and alternatively, you can take a 360° virtual wander around the landmark here.
  • Guide to Exploring Belem Tower
Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian
  • Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian
  • Dating from 1956, the Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian is an expansive multi-use space that features a library, an events venue, two museums, gardens and more. The foundation was created by an Armenian oil magnate, and the Calouste Gulbenkian Museum showcases his personal art collection, including ancient Egyptian artefacts, as well as pieces by Rembrandt and Monet. The Modern Art Centre, meanwhile, is a great spot to catch up with contemporary Portuguese artists. The property’s gardens are often home to open-air classical concerts, as well as the Jazz Festival in August, while the auditorium hosts film screenings and regular performances by the Gulbenkian Orchestra and Choir.
  • Dating from 1956, the Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian is an expansive multi-use space that features a library, an events venue, two museums, gardens and more. The foundation was created by an Armenian oil magnate, and the Calouste Gulbenkian Museum showcases his personal art collection, including ancient Egyptian artefacts, as well as pieces by Rembrandt and Monet. The Modern Art Centre, meanwhile, is a great spot to catch up with contemporary Portuguese artists. The property’s gardens are often home to open-air classical concerts, as well as the Jazz Festival in August, while the auditorium hosts film screenings and regular performances by the Gulbenkian Orchestra and Choir.
  • Guide to Exploring Gulbenkian Museum
Parque das Nações
  • Parque das Nações
  • A recently developed district on the banks of the Tagus river, Parque das Nações was once a marshy area of sleepy shipyards and industrial flotsam, but is now one of the city’s most vibrant hotspots. Parque das Nações promises a great day out for families, who can visit the Oceanarium, ride the cable car, soak up some science at the Museu da Conhecimento and picnic in the expansive gardens. Architecture buffs will be fascinated by the ultra-modern buildings, and visitors can climb the Vasco da Gama tower – Lisbon’s tallest skyscraper – to discover stunning views of the river, and marvel at the Pavilhão de Portugal, a landmark in Portuguese architecture.
  • A recently developed district on the banks of the Tagus river, Parque das Nações was once a marshy area of sleepy shipyards and industrial flotsam, but is now one of the city’s most vibrant hotspots. Parque das Nações promises a great day out for families, who can visit the Oceanarium, ride the cable car, soak up some science at the Museu da Conhecimento and picnic in the expansive gardens. Architecture buffs will be fascinated by the ultra-modern buildings, and visitors can climb the Vasco da Gama tower – Lisbon’s tallest skyscraper – to discover stunning views of the river, and marvel at the Pavilhão de Portugal, a landmark in Portuguese architecture.
  • Hop-On Hop-Off Bus Tour with Entry to Oceanário de Lisboa
Museu do Azulejo
  • Museu do Azulejo
  • While it may sound like a quirky curiosity occupying the cloisters of the off-the-beaten-path Convent of Madre Deus – a former convent dating from the 16th century – it’s important to note that the Museu do Azulejo, or “The Museum of Tiles”, has the only collection of its kind in the world. In fact, the museum is more than just a collection of tiles, it’s a monument to craftsmanship and dedication, to artisans who spent their entire lives chasing that elusive moment of artistic perfection. In the museum’s blue-and-white, 1300-tile cityscape of Lisbon dating from 1738, though, the anonymous artist just might have found it.
  • While it may sound like a quirky curiosity occupying the cloisters of the off-the-beaten-path Convent of Madre Deus – a former convent dating from the 16th century – it’s important to note that the Museu do Azulejo, or “The Museum of Tiles”, has the only collection of its kind in the world. In fact, the museum is more than just a collection of tiles, it’s a monument to craftsmanship and dedication, to artisans who spent their entire lives chasing that elusive moment of artistic perfection. In the museum’s blue-and-white, 1300-tile cityscape of Lisbon dating from 1738, though, the anonymous artist just might have found it.
  • Private Full-Day Azulejo Workshop & Museum Tour

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