Glasgow in 360º

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Highlights

Top Things To Do In Glasgow

With a reputation for live entertainment and culture, you'll find no shortage of things to see in Glasgow. This vibrant university city is a striking mix of tradition and modernity, and from world-class museums and galleries to hip shopping districts and parks, there are plenty of things to do in Glasgow. Try clicking through our 360° views to make virtual visits to some must-see landmarks.

Glasgow Cathedral
  • Glasgow Cathedral
  • Glasgow Cathedral is one of the oldest buildings in the city. Consecrated in the late 12th century, this elegant medieval Gothic edifice was one of the few old cathedrals to survive the Scottish Reformation, and has been in uninterrupted operation for over 800 years. With a full programme of services and concerts, Glasgow Cathedral is really popular with visitors and worshippers alike, and there are regular guided tours conducted by knowledgeable volunteers. Among those buried in the cathedral is Charles Macintosh, credited with inventing the waterproof coat to protect against the infamously damp Scottish weather.

  • Glasgow Cathedral is one of the oldest buildings in the city. Consecrated in the late 12th century, this elegant medieval Gothic edifice was one of the few old cathedrals to survive the Scottish Reformation, and has been in uninterrupted operation for over 800 years. With a full programme of services and concerts, Glasgow Cathedral is really popular with visitors and worshippers alike, and there are regular guided tours conducted by knowledgeable volunteers. Among those buried in the cathedral is Charles Macintosh, credited with inventing the waterproof coat to protect against the infamously damp Scottish weather.

  • Guide to Exploring Glasgow Cathedral
Buchanan Street
  • Buchanan Street
  • One of the busiest and most upmarket shopping streets in the whole of the UK, Buchanan Street is a wide, pedestrianised boulevard. Fashion shops in particular are well-represented, which has led the city council marketing department to dub the area 'Glasgow's style mile'. Buchanan Street is also home to the Buchanan Galleries shopping centre, with more than 80 stores and food outlets. But life's not all about retail therapy on Buchanan Street – there are also a number of arts venues in the vicinity, including the Glasgow Royal Concert Hall and the Gallery of Modern Art.

  • One of the busiest and most upmarket shopping streets in the whole of the UK, Buchanan Street is a wide, pedestrianised boulevard. Fashion shops in particular are well-represented, which has led the city council marketing department to dub the area 'Glasgow's style mile'. Buchanan Street is also home to the Buchanan Galleries shopping centre, with more than 80 stores and food outlets. But life's not all about retail therapy on Buchanan Street – there are also a number of arts venues in the vicinity, including the Glasgow Royal Concert Hall and the Gallery of Modern Art.

  • Guide to Exploring Buchanan Street
George Square
  • George Square
  • If the size and grandeur of the place doesn't make it immediately clear, George Square is Glasgow's main city square, and hosts major civic events from Remembrance Day to Hogmanay. The huge Beaux Arts-style building lording it over the east side is Glasgow City Chambers, home to the city council, and if you're inquisitive you can have a look around on a guided tour. As for the statues out in George Square, take a stroll around and it's pretty much a who's who of famous people from Scottish history, with Robbie Burns and Sir Walter Scott among the most well-known.

  • If the size and grandeur of the place doesn't make it immediately clear, George Square is Glasgow's main city square, and hosts major civic events from Remembrance Day to Hogmanay. The huge Beaux Arts-style building lording it over the east side is Glasgow City Chambers, home to the city council, and if you're inquisitive you can have a look around on a guided tour. As for the statues out in George Square, take a stroll around and it's pretty much a who's who of famous people from Scottish history, with Robbie Burns and Sir Walter Scott among the most well-known.

  • Guide to Exploring George Square
Riverside Museum
  • Riverside Museum
  • Open since 2011, this striking modern building in Glasgow Harbour was designed by famous architect Zaha Hadid. It's home to the Glasgow Museum of Travel, a much older institution originally established in the 1960s. The museum features both temporary exhibitions and events, plus permanent displays. Among the regular collections are galleries dealing with the effect transport has had on Glasgow's streets, how fashion and style have influenced travel, and of course the River Clyde – Glasgow's iconic waterway. Among the quirkier bits is a section on disasters and crashes, and how transport has evolved in response to these tragedies.

  • Open since 2011, this striking modern building in Glasgow Harbour was designed by famous architect Zaha Hadid. It's home to the Glasgow Museum of Travel, a much older institution originally established in the 1960s. The museum features both temporary exhibitions and events, plus permanent displays. Among the regular collections are galleries dealing with the effect transport has had on Glasgow's streets, how fashion and style have influenced travel, and of course the River Clyde – Glasgow's iconic waterway. Among the quirkier bits is a section on disasters and crashes, and how transport has evolved in response to these tragedies.

  • Riverside Museum
Glasgow Botanic Gardens
  • Glasgow Botanic Gardens
  • Founded in 1817, Glasgow Botanic Gardens flourished so successfully that they had to move to the current, larger site just 20 years later. Full of rare specimens and beautiful landscapes, the gardens are best known for their glasshouses, with the glittering dome of Kibble Palace among the most instantly recognisable structures. Comprehensively restored by 2006, this magnificent wrought iron and glass structure was originally built in the 19th century as a concert hall, and is home to many special plants and a number of sculptures. And when you're done indulging your enthusiasm for horticulture, there's a tea shop where you can take the weight off your feet.

  • Founded in 1817, Glasgow Botanic Gardens flourished so successfully that they had to move to the current, larger site just 20 years later. Full of rare specimens and beautiful landscapes, the gardens are best known for their glasshouses, with the glittering dome of Kibble Palace among the most instantly recognisable structures. Comprehensively restored by 2006, this magnificent wrought iron and glass structure was originally built in the 19th century as a concert hall, and is home to many special plants and a number of sculptures. And when you're done indulging your enthusiasm for horticulture, there's a tea shop where you can take the weight off your feet.

  • Guide to Exploring Glasgow Botanic Gardens
Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum
  • Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum
  • If there's one single attraction in Glasgow that's more popular than all the others, it's the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum. With 22 galleries and more than 8,000 exhibits, this giant institution in Glasgow's West End is ornate inside and out. There's an extensive programme of events, from tours and temporary exhibitions to daily organ recitals in the grand Central Hall. Among the highlights of the permanent collections are the gallery of arms and armour, and Fulton's Orrery, one of the most complicated models of the solar system in the world. Art lovers will want to check out the collection of Dutch and Flemish old masters.

  • If there's one single attraction in Glasgow that's more popular than all the others, it's the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum. With 22 galleries and more than 8,000 exhibits, this giant institution in Glasgow's West End is ornate inside and out. There's an extensive programme of events, from tours and temporary exhibitions to daily organ recitals in the grand Central Hall. Among the highlights of the permanent collections are the gallery of arms and armour, and Fulton's Orrery, one of the most complicated models of the solar system in the world. Art lovers will want to check out the collection of Dutch and Flemish old masters.

  • Guide to Exploring Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum
Bothwell Castle
  • Bothwell Castle
  • Set on a bend in the River Clyde, this mighty medieval castle is about 10 miles out from Glasgow city centre and makes for an interesting day trip. Originally begun in the 1200s, it's instantly recognised by its towering 'donjon' – a 25-metre round keep that's survived pretty well considering Bothwell's turbulent history. Though it was never completed, the castle played its part in the Wars of Scottish Independence in the 14th century. Apart from the donjon, other highlights of the site include the creepy medieval prison tower, and a 14th-century chapel built during one of Bothwell Castle's more peaceful phases.

  • Set on a bend in the River Clyde, this mighty medieval castle is about 10 miles out from Glasgow city centre and makes for an interesting day trip. Originally begun in the 1200s, it's instantly recognised by its towering 'donjon' – a 25-metre round keep that's survived pretty well considering Bothwell's turbulent history. Though it was never completed, the castle played its part in the Wars of Scottish Independence in the 14th century. Apart from the donjon, other highlights of the site include the creepy medieval prison tower, and a 14th-century chapel built during one of Bothwell Castle's more peaceful phases.

  • Guide to Exploring Bothwell Castle
Glasgow West End
  • Glasgow West End
  • Though many areas of Glasgow are worth a visit for different reasons, the West End is the most characterful of the lot. Think cobbled lanes, sandstone tenement blocks, sprawling gardens and grand civic buildings, and you're starting to get the idea. It's a hub of culture, hosting institutions like the Kelvingrove Museum, the Botanic Gardens and the University of Glasgow, plus sights like the Hunterian Museum and the Mackintosh House. The West End is also well-known for its large numbers of small businesses, with everything from cool coffee shops and cosy pubs to independent shops and international restaurants.

  • Though many areas of Glasgow are worth a visit for different reasons, the West End is the most characterful of the lot. Think cobbled lanes, sandstone tenement blocks, sprawling gardens and grand civic buildings, and you're starting to get the idea. It's a hub of culture, hosting institutions like the Kelvingrove Museum, the Botanic Gardens and the University of Glasgow, plus sights like the Hunterian Museum and the Mackintosh House. The West End is also well-known for its large numbers of small businesses, with everything from cool coffee shops and cosy pubs to independent shops and international restaurants.

  • Guide to Exploring Glasgow West End
University of Glasgow
  • University of Glasgow
  • Founded in the 15th century, this top-flight university is among the oldest in the English-speaking world. The main campus is located in the heart of Glasgow's fashionable West End, and is set in a collection of imposing Gothic Revival-style buildings built in the late 1800s, interspersed with more recent additions. You can join a guided tour, and the university also runs a full programme of lectures and concerts. Among the most popular visitor attractions are the Hunterian art gallery and museum, and the Mackintosh House, designed by famous Glaswegian architect and designer, Charles Rennie Mackintosh.

  • Founded in the 15th century, this top-flight university is among the oldest in the English-speaking world. The main campus is located in the heart of Glasgow's fashionable West End, and is set in a collection of imposing Gothic Revival-style buildings built in the late 1800s, interspersed with more recent additions. You can join a guided tour, and the university also runs a full programme of lectures and concerts. Among the most popular visitor attractions are the Hunterian art gallery and museum, and the Mackintosh House, designed by famous Glaswegian architect and designer, Charles Rennie Mackintosh.

  • Guide to Exploring University of Glasgow

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