Copenhagen in 360º

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Highlights

Top Things To See In Copenhagen

You won’t have to look far to find amazing things to see in Copenhagen, as this compact city punches well above its weight when it comes to historical haunts, daring design and literary landmarks. Head to Rosenborg Castle to view the Crown Jewels and catch some of the globe’s best jazz, or journey back through time with a stroll around the world’s oldest amusement park. Copenhagen has so much to do that it’s best to have a plan of action before any visit, so click on through our 360° guides to get a taster of what the city has to offer – then book, pack, and meet this most elegant of cities face to face.

Rosenborg Palace
  • Rosenborg Palace
  • Nestled in the city’s oldest royal garden, Rosenborg Castle was the royal residence until the early 18th century. Christian IV commissioned construction of the Dutch Renaissance-style building in 1606, and today it’s one of the city’s most popular attractions. Locals flock to Kongens Have, or “The King’s Garden”, which is particularly spectacular in the summer, when the roses bloom, the lawns fill with sunbathers and the Copenhagen Jazz Festival takes place. The castle is also home to the Crown Jewels and an ornate coronation throne, along with an exquisite collection of Venetian glass.
  • Nestled in the city’s oldest royal garden, Rosenborg Castle was the royal residence until the early 18th century. Christian IV commissioned construction of the Dutch Renaissance-style building in 1606, and today it’s one of the city’s most popular attractions. Locals flock to Kongens Have, or “The King’s Garden”, which is particularly spectacular in the summer, when the roses bloom, the lawns fill with sunbathers and the Copenhagen Jazz Festival takes place. The castle is also home to the Crown Jewels and an ornate coronation throne, along with an exquisite collection of Venetian glass.
  • Copenhagen Card: 70+ Attractions on 1 Card
Amalienborg Palace
  • Amalienborg Palace
  • Amalienborg Palace has been the home of the monarchy since 1794, and offers a fascinating look at the history of Danish royalty. The complex includes two palaces that are open to the public, and visitors can check out the ornate lodgings of Christian XI and Queen Louise, whose children would go on to reign in England, Russia and Greece. The Great Hall in Christian VII’s Palace is especially notable, as it’s a stunning example of Danish Rococo style, while Christian VIII’s Palace provides a look at some of the private royal apartments. The daily changing of the guard at noon also draws a crowd.
  • Amalienborg Palace has been the home of the monarchy since 1794, and offers a fascinating look at the history of Danish royalty. The complex includes two palaces that are open to the public, and visitors can check out the ornate lodgings of Christian XI and Queen Louise, whose children would go on to reign in England, Russia and Greece. The Great Hall in Christian VII’s Palace is especially notable, as it’s a stunning example of Danish Rococo style, while Christian VIII’s Palace provides a look at some of the private royal apartments. The daily changing of the guard at noon also draws a crowd.
  • Guide to Exploring Amalienborg Palace
The Little Mermaid
  • The Little Mermaid
  • Edvard Eriksen’s Little Mermaid statue on the Langelinie Pier has become one of the city’s more enduring icons, appearing in numerous films and drawing admirers from around the world. Gifted to the city by a brewer in 1913, the statue immortalises one of Hans Christian Andersen’s most beloved characters, and is a must-see attraction for anyone looking for artsy things to do in Copenhagen. Take a virtual 360° stroll around Langelinie and the Little Mermaid here, and then start drawing up your Hans Christian Andersen-inspired tour of the city. It’s sure to make for a fairytale of a trip!
  • Edvard Eriksen’s Little Mermaid statue on the Langelinie Pier has become one of the city’s more enduring icons, appearing in numerous films and drawing admirers from around the world. Gifted to the city by a brewer in 1913, the statue immortalises one of Hans Christian Andersen’s most beloved characters, and is a must-see attraction for anyone looking for artsy things to do in Copenhagen. Take a virtual 360° stroll around Langelinie and the Little Mermaid here, and then start drawing up your Hans Christian Andersen-inspired tour of the city. It’s sure to make for a fairytale of a trip!
  • City Walking Tour in Small Group
Tivoli Gardens
  • Tivoli Gardens
  • The fairytale-esque Tivoli Gardens offers much more than a fun-filled day out for the family; it’s also the second-oldest amusement park in the World, making it a hotspot for history buffs and thrill-seekers alike. The quaint park has won the hearts of everyone from Hans Christian Andersen to Walt Disney, and its old-school charms have recently been augmented with modern attractions such as Vertigo – voted Europe’s best ride in 2012 – and The Demon, a virtual-reality rollercoaster. Tivoli Gardens is particularly photogenic at night, when the twinkling lights add a colourful backdrop, and fireworks frequently light up the sky.
  • The fairytale-esque Tivoli Gardens offers much more than a fun-filled day out for the family; it’s also the second-oldest amusement park in the World, making it a hotspot for history buffs and thrill-seekers alike. The quaint park has won the hearts of everyone from Hans Christian Andersen to Walt Disney, and its old-school charms have recently been augmented with modern attractions such as Vertigo – voted Europe’s best ride in 2012 – and The Demon, a virtual-reality rollercoaster. Tivoli Gardens is particularly photogenic at night, when the twinkling lights add a colourful backdrop, and fireworks frequently light up the sky.
  • Discover Hotels Near Tivoli Gardens
Nyhavn
  • Nyhavn
  • Bustling and hip might not be the first words that come to mind when describing classical Copenhagen, but Nyhavn is rewriting the Danish rulebook. The 17th-century waterfront neighbourhood has long drawn crowds to its colourful gabled houses and languid canals, but it’s recently seen a boom of modern restaurants and cutting-edge pubs, especially in Kongens Nytorv Square, where organic open-air eateries jostle for space with chic French bistros. Nyhavn is also Hans Christian Andersen country – he lived in Kongens Nytorv – and it’s not difficult to imagine how Andersen’s Copenhagen must have looked, as many of the houses on the quays have stood for centuries.
  • Bustling and hip might not be the first words that come to mind when describing classical Copenhagen, but Nyhavn is rewriting the Danish rulebook. The 17th-century waterfront neighbourhood has long drawn crowds to its colourful gabled houses and languid canals, but it’s recently seen a boom of modern restaurants and cutting-edge pubs, especially in Kongens Nytorv Square, where organic open-air eateries jostle for space with chic French bistros. Nyhavn is also Hans Christian Andersen country – he lived in Kongens Nytorv – and it’s not difficult to imagine how Andersen’s Copenhagen must have looked, as many of the houses on the quays have stood for centuries.
  • Guide to Exploring Nyhavn
The Round Tower
  • The Round Tower
  • Another one of Christian IV’s famous architectural projects (he’s also responsible for Rosenborg Castle and Frederiksborg Castle), the Round Tower is the oldest functioning observatory on the Continent. The 17th-century tower was built during Denmark’s astronomical heyday, after the Dane Tycho Brahe helped usher in a new era of cosmic understanding, and although a handful of amateur astronomers still search the Copenhagen skies from the observatory, it’s settled in as one of the city’s premier attractions for families. There’s an outdoor platform providing stunning views of the city, but be prepared to climb an immense spiral staircase to reach it.
  • Another one of Christian IV’s famous architectural projects (he’s also responsible for Rosenborg Castle and Frederiksborg Castle), the Round Tower is the oldest functioning observatory on the Continent. The 17th-century tower was built during Denmark’s astronomical heyday, after the Dane Tycho Brahe helped usher in a new era of cosmic understanding, and although a handful of amateur astronomers still search the Copenhagen skies from the observatory, it’s settled in as one of the city’s premier attractions for families. There’s an outdoor platform providing stunning views of the city, but be prepared to climb an immense spiral staircase to reach it.
  • Guide to Exploring Round Tower
National Museum Of Denmark
  • National Museum Of Denmark
  • Housed in the 18th-century Prince’s Palace, the National Museum Denmark is Denmark’s largest historical museum, and the perfect place to work your way through the country’s extraordinary history. The museum’s Viking Age artefacts are especially noteworthy, as are its displays from ancient Christiana, including an original tobacco stall. Other must-see exhibits are a wonderfully preserved Victorian apartment from the 1890s, the 3,000-year-old Sun Chariot, the tree-trunk coffin of the Egtved Girl – dating from the Bronze Age – and the Huldremose Woman, whose remains are thought to date back 2,000 years. There’s also a kids’ museum where children can learn about the Vikings.
  • Housed in the 18th-century Prince’s Palace, the National Museum Denmark is Denmark’s largest historical museum, and the perfect place to work your way through the country’s extraordinary history. The museum’s Viking Age artefacts are especially noteworthy, as are its displays from ancient Christiana, including an original tobacco stall. Other must-see exhibits are a wonderfully preserved Victorian apartment from the 1890s, the 3,000-year-old Sun Chariot, the tree-trunk coffin of the Egtved Girl – dating from the Bronze Age – and the Huldremose Woman, whose remains are thought to date back 2,000 years. There’s also a kids’ museum where children can learn about the Vikings.
  • Guide to Exploring National Museum of Denmark
Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek
  • Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek
  • Housing the personal art collection of one of the scions of the Carlsberg Brewery, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek should be on any art lover’s itinerary. The museum is notable for its sculpture collection, and displays works from ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a complete collection of Edgar Degas’s bronze sculptures and one of the biggest Rodin collections in the world. It’s also home to an impressive range of paintings, and visitors can view work by Manet, Gauguin, Picasso and Cézanne. Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek offers classical concerts year-round, and also has an elegant Winter Garden and a cosy café. Admission is free on Tuesdays.
  • Housing the personal art collection of one of the scions of the Carlsberg Brewery, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek should be on any art lover’s itinerary. The museum is notable for its sculpture collection, and displays works from ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a complete collection of Edgar Degas’s bronze sculptures and one of the biggest Rodin collections in the world. It’s also home to an impressive range of paintings, and visitors can view work by Manet, Gauguin, Picasso and Cézanne. Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek offers classical concerts year-round, and also has an elegant Winter Garden and a cosy café. Admission is free on Tuesdays.
  • Guide to Exploring Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek
The Marble Church
  • The Marble Church
  • Topped by a stunning copper dome and known as ‘The Marble Church” due to its rococo architecture, the origins of Frederik’s Church date from 1749, but it wasn’t completed until nearly 150 years later. Today the church is one of Copenhagen’s most beautiful buildings, and its location near Amalienborg Palace makes it a must-visit for those touring the Frederiksstaden quarter. The church’s cupola is magnificently decorated with angels and apostles, while the altar is a great example of Roman Baroque style. The expansive dome, meanwhile, provides breathtaking views of the city, and can be visited every afternoon during the summer.
  • Topped by a stunning copper dome and known as ‘The Marble Church” due to its rococo architecture, the origins of Frederik’s Church date from 1749, but it wasn’t completed until nearly 150 years later. Today the church is one of Copenhagen’s most beautiful buildings, and its location near Amalienborg Palace makes it a must-visit for those touring the Frederiksstaden quarter. The church’s cupola is magnificently decorated with angels and apostles, while the altar is a great example of Roman Baroque style. The expansive dome, meanwhile, provides breathtaking views of the city, and can be visited every afternoon during the summer.
  • Discover Hotels Near Frederik's Church

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