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Check prices on hotels in Ulster Hall

Tonight 24 May - 25 May
This weekend 24 May - 26 May
Next weekend 31 May - 2 Jun

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See all 405 properties in Ulster Hall

Estimated price for 1 night/2 adults

Park Inn by Radisson Belfast
Park Inn by Radisson Belfast
3.0 out of 5.040 yd from Ulster Hall
Free cancellation
4.3/5 (1,557 reviews)
£61/ night for 2 guests

Park inn is situated within a 10 minute walk of the city Front desk staff are friendly and very helpful

Reviewed on 25 Apr 2019
Grand Central Hotel Belfast
Grand Central Hotel Belfast
4.0 out of 5.0125 yd from Ulster Hall
Free cancellation
4.6/5 (134 reviews)
£126/ night for 2 guests

Room had everything you could need. The toiletries were fantastic.

Reviewed on 17 May 2019
ETAP Belfast
ETAP Belfast
2.0 out of 5.00.2 mi from Ulster Hall
Free cancellation
3.7/5 (812 reviews)
£39/ night for 2 guests

Clean rooms, friendly helpful staff, great location

Reviewed on 21 May 2019
easyHotel Belfast
easyHotel Belfast
3.0 out of 5.00.1 mi from Ulster Hall
4.3/5 (447 reviews)
£43/ night for 2 guests

Lovely central location just down from the city hall and a hop on hop off tour has a pick up point basically right outside!

Reviewed on 20 May 2019
Hampton by Hilton Belfast City Centre
Hampton by Hilton Belfast City Centre
3.5 out of 5.00.1 mi from Ulster Hall
Free cancellation
4.5/5 (419 reviews)
£71/ night for 2 guests

It’s closeness to the City Centre. Rooms were clean and tidy. And the breakfast buffet was lovely.

Reviewed on 23 May 2019
Jurys Inn Belfast
Jurys Inn Belfast
4.0 out of 5.00.1 mi from Ulster Hall
Free cancellation
4.2/5 (1,724 reviews)
£67/ night for 2 guests

Great location staff helpful and friendly food lovely looking forward to coming back soon

Reviewed on 22 May 2019
Holiday Inn Belfast City Centre
Holiday Inn Belfast City Centre
4.0 out of 5.00.1 mi from Ulster Hall
Free cancellation
4.1/5 (1,776 reviews)
£60/ night for 2 guests

The front desk staff were very accommodating and allowed us to check in early, helping us arrange transportation and guiding us with maps. Beautiful hotel and room, very clean and modern, I would highly recommend this hotel

Reviewed on 17 May 2019
Europa Hotel
Europa Hotel
4.0 out of 5.0172 yd from Ulster Hall
Free cancellation
4.3/5 (1,379 reviews)
£86/ night for 2 guests

Loved our stay! All we could have asked for in a convenient location

Reviewed on 23 May 2019
Maldron Hotel Belfast City
Maldron Hotel Belfast City
4.0 out of 5.0141 yd from Ulster Hall
Free cancellation
4.5/5 (500 reviews)
£57/ night for 2 guests

car drop off point was concerning, not sure if i woulf get a ticket

Reviewed on 20 May 2019
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Pocket Guide: Ulster Hall Ulster Hall Hotels

Ulster Hall is at the heart of Belfast and at the heart of some of Northern Ireland’s key cultural and political events. The music venue, nicknamed the Grand Dame of Bedford Street by locals, has hosted some of Ireland’s and Britain’s most famous names ever since it opened in 1862.

The building was commissioned with a competition to design a new music venue, and Ulster Hall’s main feature was an enormous pipe organ, to drown out the sounds of the linen factory nearby. The Mulholland organ was restored in the late 1970s and is used at some classical music concerts.

Over last 150 years, Ulster Hall has seen appearances by no less than James Joyce and Charles Dickens, who gave readings from A Christmas Carol and David Copperfield in 1869, and the famous Italian opera singer Enrico Caruso in 1909.

More recently, Led Zeppelin gave the first performance of their most famous song, Stairway to Heaven, at Ulster Hall in 1971 and punk bands like Stiff Little Fingers, the Undertones and the Boomtown Rats performed there as well as Manic Street Preachers, AC/DC and the Rolling Stones.

It is the political rallies that Ulster Hall is more famous for. In the early 20th Century, Lord Randolph Churchill led opposition to William Gladstone’s Home Rule in Ireland bill in the hall, while his son Winston Churchill was locked out several years later when trying to speak in favour of Home Rule. John Tyndall, a Victorian scientist, provoked outrage from both protestant and catholic preachers for putting the case for science over religion. And in 1986, loyalists held a meeting led by Sir Ian Paisley forming an organisation called Ulster Resistance objecting to the Anglo-Irish Agreement.

The venue is still one of the most active in Belfast and continues to host classical concerts and pop music, craft fairs and political conferences.