Malia holidays

Experience Malia

Experience [destination]

Best Places to Visit

Heraklion is a short drive away from Malia on good roads and is a hub for shopping, café culture, heritage landmarks and the Heraklion Archaeological Museum. The museum is world-famous for its stunning collection of artefacts from the 4,000-year old Minoan Palace of Knossos, located a few kilometres from the city and well worth a trip.

For a fun family day out, Star Beach Water Resort lies just 10 minutes' drive from Malia. Here, you'll find slides, pools, a beach offering scuba-diving, parasailing, waterskiing, a lazy river, music bars featuring foam parties and guest DJs, and a choice of eateries. There's also an exclusive spa offering treatments for those who feel they need half a day's pampering.

Malia's series of large and small beaches spread along a two-kilometre stretch, with the larger strands equipped with beach bars, umbrellas and sunbeds for hire, banana boats and outlets for jet-skiing, bungee-jumping and waterskiing. Backed by hotels with pools, the beaches are quiet before lunchtime, as most revellers are sleeping off the night before.

Malia Old Town is well worth visiting for its traditional vibes, lovely houses decked with flowering Bougainvilleas and little tavernas serving traditional Cretan food accompanied by live Greek music. The narrow streets come alive at night, with tables on the cobbles and Greek dancing when the mood takes diners and drinkers. It's a million miles from the revellery common in the New Town.

Agios Nikolaos is an attractive city set to the east of Malia in a hilly location which is accessed either by road or scenic boat trip. Its fine promenade runs along the beaches and Lake Voulismeni is mythologically believed to be the place where the goddess Athena bathed. Tavernas surround its pretty port and the narrow streets of the old quarter are charming.

A winding road from Malia will lead visitors to the small village of Krassi. Krassi is a picturesque village. It is dominated by a vast sycamore tree, which overlooks the tiny village square and is thought to be over 1000 years old. There are many cafés in the village and some traditional tavernas, serving simple and rustic food.

Nearby Mohos offers superb views of the Hersonissos area. A quaint and well-preserved town, it has upheld many of its traditions and visitors can experience them first-hand at the Cretan nights, which are held every Wednesday evening.

Top Landmarks

A day out in Heraklion has to include a visit to the Heraklion Archaeological Museum, home to a number of artefacts excavated from Crete's Minoan sites.

The powerful civilisation was incredibly wealthy until it was destroyed by the effects of the massive eruption on Santorini, with the museum displays including magnificent gold jewellery, statues and 4,000-year old frescos.

The Fortress of Koules was built in the 16th century to guard Venetian Heraklion and is famed for its thick walls and Venetian lion plaques above its gates. The fortress sits on a jutting promontory and is in excellent condition; now used for art exhibitions and musical events. Check out the Old Town's Venetian walls as well. Just outside Malia are the ruins of the third-largest Minoan palace on Crete, easily accessible via a pleasant walk along the beach from the town. Unlike Knossos, the Malia palace was rebuilt after the Santorini earthquake, and today's visitors can explore various areas of the site. The great central courtyard has steps leading to a maze of small rooms, and huge ceramic jars for storing olive oil, grain and water are still in place.

Malia's Old Town has several Greek Orthodox churches with spectacular interiors, with the central Agios Nektarios home to ornate gilded carvings and a giant chandelier. Every inch of the walls is covered with colourful frescos depicting religious scenes. Agios Dimitrios nestles in a charming square and tiny, quaint Panagia Galatiani is Malia's oldest church, built in the traditional manner with mud bricks.

Entertainment

Malia is divided into two areas: the New Town backing the beaches and the quieter Old Town with its Cretan bars and tavernas. The bustling resort area is now giving Ibiza a run for its money, offering clubs and all-night watering holes that are popular with younger crowds.

The all-night action takes place along a 1,500m stretch linking the national road with the beach. The frenzied nightlife here kicks off at around 23:00pm and goes on until late or even sunrise, depending on demand. With over 30 bars and pubs, and 30 nightclubs, live music and reverbating beats can be heard pumping out of most places.

The Candy Club is one of the hottest venues and funky WKD Bar encourages ravers to arrive in costume. If you're a karaoke fan, the Premier Bar has more than 1,000 songs to choose from and Apollo Nightclub closes later than the rest. Safari Club Malia is famous for its extra-strong drinks while Help Bar is infamous for its huge 'fish bowl' cocktail containing a potent mix of spices and strong spirits.

In contrast, the Old Town area of Malia offers traditional tavernas and smaller, less frenetic bars for those who're looking for a different style of evening entertainment.

Traditional Cretan food is served in the majority of eateries and the music tends more towards live Greek than electronic. The area has pretty squares which are perfect for people wanting to take a slow walk in the cool evening air.

Dining Out

Malia has a choice of many different cuisines, with international options varying from fast foods through Italian, Spanish, British pub grub, Chinese, Thai and Mexican. For foodies in love with Greek food, however, it's best to stay away from the nightlife district and instead head for the Old Town's tavernas. Several dozen tavernas can be found here, with most featuring outside seating, good food, music, plate-smashing and Greek dances most nights.

Cretan cuisine is highly regarded for making use of the island's flavourful olive oil, offering fresh salads topped with local myzithra cheese and delicious seafood and lamb main courses. Meze starters are the traditional entrees and usually compose of tiny plates with a variety of dips, olives, pickles and more. Other typical Cretan dishes include rabbit with a yoghurt sauce (kouneli me yiaourti) and snails. The sweet, melt-in-the-mouth Cretan pastries are made with filo pastry, chopped nuts and lashings of honey.

The tavernas around Malia's Church Port and New Port are good places to dine with a view of the two ports and the sunset, although they tend to be crowded in the high season. Another good spot is the Socrates Restaurant, which is typically Cretan and well recommended.

Beach

Malia's main beach area is packed to the brim during the high season and comes with attractions such as table tennis, pool tables, loud music played by resident DJs, and dozens of bars backing the sands. This area forms a buzzing, sandy extension of the nightlife area, complete with a wide choice of water sports. For a peaceful day in the sun with a good book, try the remote beach of Potamos: it's clean, quiet, very beautiful and mostly used by local Cretans.   

Romance

Malia's Old City offers a romantic backdrop for those who want to enjoy a fine meal and an evening of conversation. One way to get away from it all is to take a private day or two-day cruise around the Cretan coastline, stopping off at tiny bays for lunch and a swim, visiting deserted offshore islands or enjoying a barbecue and sunset views on a beach.

Family

For family holidays in Malia, try the smaller, more family-friendly hotels in and around the Old City and on the outskirts of town, away from the nightlife. The Greek people are extremely friendly towards children and do their best to make feel families welcome. Most small hotels have swimming pools suitable for children, while lodgings are usually within easy reach of local taverns and walking distance of the beach.

Adventure

Adventure activities in Mali are mainly centred around water sports, with motor boating, jet-skiing, windsurfing, waterskiing, paragliding and sport fishing all available. Those looking for more extreme adventures should head for nearby Heraklion, where a number of companies offer daytrips to the mountains for rock-climbing, mountain biking, canyoning, canoeing, kayaking and white water rafting. 

Need to know

Need to know [destination]

Language

Greek is the official language here, although the Cretan version of the language is slightly different. Malia is all about tourism, with young British revellers making up the majority of holidaymakers. English is widely spoken in the town as a result, as are several other European languages. However, visitors who want make the most of the quieter villages and restaurants in Malia might do well to invest in a phrasebook. The people of Malia are warm and welcoming and tend to look favourably upon those who attempt even the most basic courtesies and greetings in the island's native tongue.

Currency

The euro is the official currency of Crete. Bank notes range from 5 to 50 euros while coins range from 1 to 50 cents. 1 and 2 euro coins are also accepted as legal tender. Hotel front desks can provide currency exchange services, but often at poorer rates than can be found elsewhere. Major credit and debit cards are accepted in most places, although small shops, bars and eateries will require cash payment. A combination of cash and cards works best here. However, for those uncomfortable with carrying large sums of money, there are official exchange kiosks to be found in Malia. For lower fees, banks are a better option.

Visas

Greece is a member country of the Schengen Agreement, in which 26 separate European nations agreed to open their internal borders to other member nations. As a result, Greece is open to citizens of all Schengen states. Citizens of EU countries which have not signed the agreement, including the UK, are also granted access to the country without a visa and for an unlimited period. However, it is still worth carrying a passport, credit card and driving license in the event of needing to hire certain things, such as car-hire. Non-EU citizens need a visa to enter as a tourist for up to 90 days. Nationals of Non-EU countries should check with their nearest Greek embassy or online for visa requirements and costs.

Climate

Malia’s climate is warm and mild – perfect for a spot of sunbathing and sightseeing. While you may experience rainfall during a winter trip, the temperature will still come in at around a balmy 12.7°C. During the summer months, temperatures can average 26.6°C, with July and August being the hottest months of the year.

Main Airports

Heraklion International Airport is the main transport hub for Malia and is just a short bus, taxi or car ride away. The airport serves routes to a number of European destinations, including the UK, with low-cost, charter and several full-service carriers, as well as flights to mainland Athens and Thessaloniki.

Flight Options

Summer travellers from the UK can take flights from London-Gatwick, London-Luton, East Midlands, Leeds-Bradford or Manchester. Other airlines also offer seasonal flights from Glasgow-International and Birmingham. Flight times between the UK and Crete average around 4 hours.

Travel Advice

For a split journey to avoid the UK's flight tax, the Eurostar from London to Paris is a possibility, perhaps including a day or two in the City of Lights. Taxi travel in Malia is inexpensive and local buses are even cheaper.

Other Transport Options

Travelling to Malia from the UK by train or bus and ferry is fun, although sometimes more expensive than flying. Comfortable, long-distance buses to Athens leave from Victoria Coach Station in London. By rail, the Eurostar connects London with Paris, from where the Bologna-bound Euronight Sleeper departs. From Bologna, there are rail connections to Bari in the far south of Italy, where you can take a ferry to Patras, which has bus links with Athens. Once in the capital, you can choose between another ferry or a flight to Heraklion, with the entire trip taking around three days.

Getting Around

Getting around Malia is straightforward, tourists can either travel on foot, taxi or local bus. It's a small town, with just over 6,000 permanent residents, although population numbers swell by several thousand in the high summer season. Scooters, quad bikes, motorbikes, bicycles and cars can easily be hired and give the freedom to go where you please, when you please.

Bus

Malia has a useful local bus service that runs regularly along all the popular routes, linking the quieter Old Town with the party-goers along the beach. Buses run to Heraklion, Agios Nikolaos, Stalis village and the Minoan archaeological site just outside town. They also run along the beach road, the main street and the coast road. Bus stops have blue signs and timetables are shown.

Car

Cars can be hired from a selection of well-known companies on arrival at Heraklion International Airport or in Heraklion town, or at local car hire offices in Malia. Although self-drive isn't really necessary for a beach and party holiday here, if sightseeing around the region is on the agenda, it's the best way to get around, as public transport, although reliable, tends to be infrequent.

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MALIA`S WEATHER TODAY

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AVERAGE RAINFALL (mm)

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FACTS

  1. Malia Palace is the third largest palace of Minoan Crete, superseded only by Phaistos and Knossos
  2. Crete has over 2000 species of plant, of which 157 are endemic
  3. Crete remained separate from Greece, until 1913
  4. According to the myths and legends of the Ancient Greeks, the god Zeus was born in Crete and hid in a cave so that his father, Cronus, wouldn't kill him

FACTS

  1. Malia Palace is the third largest palace of Minoan Crete, superseded only by Phaistos and Knossos
  2. Crete has over 2000 species of plant, of which 157 are endemic
  3. Crete remained separate from Greece, until 1913
  4. According to the myths and legends of the Ancient Greeks, the god Zeus was born in Crete and hid in a cave so that his father, Cronus, wouldn't kill him

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