Luxury holidays in Croatia

  • Croatia Luxury holidays

    From the capital Zagreb to the islands off the Dalmatian coast, Croatia has staked its claim to a sizeable tourism market, which continues to grow. Croatia joined the EU in 2013 and its currency the kuna was soon brought to within a very close exchange rate with the continent's single currency, the euro, ahead of plans for Croatia to join the Eurozone and adopt the new currency officially. Tourism is a crucial contributor to the Croatian economy, accounting for a fifth of GDP in some estimates, and boosting domestic businesses in many different sectors too.

    Croatia's coastal islands

    Croatia has a large number of islands along its western coast - very large, according to some definitions, which count more than a thousand land masses as belonging to the country. In practical terms the definition of 'island' is normally reserved for just under 80 of the larger land masses, with the remainder being called islets or, for the very smallest, simply 'rocks'. Cres is now thought to be the largest of all the islands, although Krk is very close to the same size, and historically was often referred to as the largest. Badija is the biggest islet in the group at 0.97 square kilometres, naRowly missing out on the 1km threshold to be classified as Croatia's 80th island proper.

    Croatia's biological diversity

    The geography of Croatia means it has a wide variety of different habitats, and this leads not only to a range of different animal life, but also to some unusual individual species. A distinctive landscape feature is the presence of 'karst' habitats, caves formed by dissolving rock underground, and in these is found the Olm, a completely aquatic salamander, and the only known cave-dwelling aquatic vertebrate.

    When should I visit Croatia?

    Although Croatia's EU membership should not have adverse effects on its culture, you may want to visit sooner rather than later if you want to get your hands on its own currency, the kuna, as a souvenir of the country before its transition to the Euro. In terms of weather, Croatia is mild but not overpoweringly hot, with summer temperatures reaching up towards 20°C, and winter temperatures generally around freezing point or just below. The coastline of the Adriatic Sea is the place to be for warmer temperatures, as well as higher sunshine totals, while the islands of Hvar and Korcula record the highest amounts of sun overall.

    What’s on offer on a luxury holiday?

    Luxury holidays in Croatia are all about doing exactly what you want to do. If you want to be able to gaze across the sparkling water from your room, your luxury hotel will make it happen, and if you fancy a champagne breakfast, they’ll arrange that, too. Everything you need to have a once-in-a-lifetime experience will be provided on your luxury holiday. Paying a small amount extra for a luxury package is well worth it in Croatia, and the level of pampering you receive during your stay is entirely up to you. Croatia offers word-class luxury, and while you certainly won’t have ski-slopes outside your room, you will have access to a beautiful coastline and a holiday where every single detail is taken care of by friendly, warm Croatians happy to welcome you to their beautiful country.

Luxury Destinations in Croatia

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7 nights from £1219/pp